Accelerate Podcast with Andy Paul
February 24, 2017

How to Have a Mindful, Focused Mindset. With Bridget Gleason. #390

Welcome to another Front Line Friday with my very special guest and co-host, Bridget Gleason. On this week’s episode, Bridget and I discuss a mindset of gratitude, dealing with problems and getting over the frustrations they cause without anger. We also discuss the addiction to digital messaging, and the pitfalls of trying to multitask in sales.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[:45] Bridget is grateful for life. Experience helps her look over frustrations as they occur, reflecting on past frustrations that were worse, of which the causes were forgotten. She deals with them, goes on, and models and shares this behavior.

[4:36] Give people permission not to get all worked up. Frustration doesn’t need anger, bitterness, or disappointment. It is an opportunity to address a problem, without hanging onto the emotion around it. Don’t be addicted to anger.

[6:43] Andy cites Simon Sinek on challenges Millennials have, including the dopamine-driven addiction to texts, emails, and replies. The anticipation for these creates a distraction. Bridget doesn’t crave the interruptions, especially in the morning.

[8:26] Andy gave a presentation to inside sales reps, and saw people checking their phones. He stopped and asked if they kept their phones on their desk while they were making calls. 100% of them raised their hands.

[9:23] Next he asked, who looks at it, if it buzzes while you’re on a call with a buyer? Virtually everybody. The science is absolutely conclusive. We do not multitask. Looking at a text while talking to a customer distracts you from the customer.

[10:41] Looking at a chat or text, to be “responsive,” to a buyer, while you are talking with another, only makes you less responsive to the person actually talking to you. You may only have this one opportunity with the person on the phone.

[12:16] Chat, with one person managing multiple chat windows, divides attention and concentration on any specific conversation. Invite the chat to move up to another channel that allows more personalized attention, even, maybe, a visit.

[13:49] Are older people going to have to incorporate these quick, short chats into their sales process? As humans, we are incapable of switching our attention rapidly and efficiently.

[14:44] Carnegie Mellon research shows that our test-taking ability (a measure of intelligence) falls after an interruption, to the point of making us 20% “dumber.” In a chat, each separate conversation is sub-optimal.

[16:52] Two multi-tasking people chatting with each other, makes the conversation doubly sub-optimal and unfocused.

[17:39] People who can’t resist trying to do two things at once are suckers for irrelevancy, according to Stanford sociologist Clifford Nass. It is efficient and respectful to focus on one thing. Put distractions away. Put your phone in a drawer, or away.

 

February 23, 2017

How to Quickly Qualify Your Prospects. With Sean Burke. #389

Joining me once again on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest Sean Burke, CEO of KiteDesk. Among the topics that Sean and I discuss are the problems sales professionals have today with prospects going dark, how prospects should be more fully qualified before the reps spend too much of their time, and the NOTE process for qualifying, explaining, and closing deals.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[:52] Sean started sales with his mother at age 12, selling burglar alarms. His mother trained him well how to make money. KiteDesk is his ninth early-stage venture, in sales and marketing, for revenue generation; sometimes as the CEO.

[2:11] Sean sees sales reps struggling to find out what’s going on inside the buyer’s walls. There are so many influencers. Often, the prospect just goes dark, and you never know why.

Andy suggests this is a failure of qualification and discovery.

[4:15] Sean looks for landmines, to plan pre-emptively for them, such as budgets, product releases, or other projects demanding resources.

[5:40] Sean sees a lot of surprises he didn’t see in the 90s. Andy attributes these changes to technology, and behaviors related to new technologies.

[6:29] Sean sees BANT (Budget, Authority, Need, and Timeline) as outdated for new companies. (It still works for IBM.) Sean has come up with NOTE (Need, Opportunity, Team, Effect) to qualify leads based on the buyer’s needs.

[8:25] Sean was trying to find a way to make the discovery process extremely valuable, especially the buyer, and to be responsive and efficient with the time spent with buyers.

[12:29] Sean refers to Anthony Iannarino’s book where he said that if you’re in sales, you’re focused on outcomes. Sean wanted to lead with outcomes, not features or benefits.

[12:55] If the client doesn’t Need the outcome of the benefit of your product for the cost to implement it, then there is no qualified lead. Tell them there’s no good fit here. Either they will rethink their need, or you will save everyone a lot of time.

[14:52]  Some of the need is philosophical. Sean refers to the ‘find your why’ works of Simon Sinek. It’s great to find a company in synch with your philosophy.

[15:51] Opportunity is a pressing requirement. Is the need great enough to attack now? Sean uses a scoping method to determine ROI, and asks, does the proposed solution justify the expense? This gives the prospect a way to qualify in or out.

[19:49] Team is composed of multiple stakeholders with a sense of urgency. Defining who is impacted by the opportunity helps the client qualify themselves for the deal. There is also a team defined of the influencers involved to get to “yes.”

[24:33] Effect is the experienced value of the product or service to the buyer. It is not the opportunity. The full opportunity doesn’t result on Day 1. The effect is developing the working plan to get through the process and track it for success.

February 22, 2017

How to Reach the Right Contacts with the Right Messages. With Victoria Godfrey. #388

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest Victoria Godfrey, CMO of Avention, now part of Dun and Bradstreet. Among the many topics that Victoria and I discuss are the various ways Avention is helping drive revenue and growth for companies by harnessing target account and contact information. We also discuss account based everything, and how aligning marketing with sales, following the data, helps improve the number of closed deals.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[:52] Avention works with company and contact business data. Victoria joined Avention a couple of years ago, after a career in marketing. Avention tools offer B2B data, relative to target accounts and contacts, that help drive revenue and growth.

[2:08] Avention offers iSell, an easy and effective subscription desktop app that gathers all the information a salesperson needs to go after new accounts and customers, with SWOT analysis, and company and contact information.

[4:15] Another Avention tool is The Art of the Start, pairing marketing and sales, to pick the best sales qualified accounts. Messaging is tailored to the target account and their contact, focused on getting the right message to the right person.

[6:53] Victoria’s team uses Avention tools to reach targets by looking at triggers, news alerts, company information, reports, and more, to discover the important drivers and initiatives of the account. Account contacts receive tailored messages.

[8:55] It is critical for marketing and sales to be aligned, to send a unified message to the account. Reps are responsible for engaging contacts with the aligned message.

[12:18] When marketing and sales are aligned, they own the funnel together. Marketing owns the top, sales owns the bottom; each influences the other. The revenue is attributed to both. If the CEO is not supportive, alignment is unrealized.

[15:53] At Avention, Victoria, and the head of sales spend a lot of time in each other’s offices, discussing mutual needs, budgets, efficiencies, and results. Data and Martech tools empower transparency and alignment.

[17:23] Marketing and sales use data tools and experienced judgment to pick accounts together, to assign resources, and create the unified messaging point. Frequency depends on the sales cycle and strategy. Avention does this, ongoing.

[21:54] Because of the intensive use of resources, you will use parallel paths for sales: some are account based, and some use conventional sales efforts.

[25:30] Victoria discusses data-driven sales. Data has made great changes in marketing, and martech has boomed over the last decade or so. The same is true in sales. Data drives revenue growth. To neglect data is to lose opportunity.

[29:52] CRM data is being used by some companies mainly for reporting results. More emphasis should be paid to using data to engage enterprises and drive more sales.

[30:44] Avention also offers DataVision, that combines your data with Avention data, to segment clearly the key and top-priority accounts.

February 21, 2017

How to Draw to Win. With Dan Roam. #387

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest Dan Roam, President of Digital Roam, bestselling author of multiple books, including, The Back of the Napkin, and the book we’re going to talk about today, Draw to Win. Among the topics that Dan and I discuss are Dan’s history with drawing, Dan’s study of visual processing in the human brain and how it opens the door to greater understanding.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[2:24] Dan has always drawn. In university he studied organic chemistry and painting, and learned the same structural concepts. Dan wanted to push this modeling concept into business. People remember pictures over paragraphs.

[7:07] Dan’s girlfriend was a nanny in the Soviet Union, and got Dan a visa to work there. He worked at a tourist magazine. He stayed seven years, founding the first Western ad agency.

In Russia, Dan communicated largely with pictures.

[12:09] Dan liked working with business people, helping them clarify their ideas. He came back to the U.S., and continued with the same approach. Dan realized early on that a flip chart would help each person understand a deal.

[15:00] Each time Dan’s company did a flipboard pitch, they won; many times even when, by their small size, they shouldn’t have. They were the ones who drew the client a picture.

[16:21] People want a story, and a connection; they want to trust you. We neglect the fact that people would like to see some honest creativity taking place in the actual meeting. [17:57] About ⅓ of your brain by weight is dedicated to vision. Another ⅓ of your brain is dedicated to processing vision along with other sensory input. That leaves ⅓ of your brain for everything else, besides visual processing.

[23:45] Our brains could hold the imagery from 33 million Blu-ray Disc movies. To memorize speeches, assign each thought to a particular visual, in a train of images.

[27:33] You can draw anything, if you can draw a circle, a square, a triangle, a line, a blob, and an arrow. Use stick figures. This is not an artistic process. This is a thinking process. The simpler the visual, the better the communication.

[28:04] It took years of training to learn how to write your name. It takes about five minutes for an adult to learn the process of drawing. Confidence comes with practice. The picture is another tool in your communication toolbelt.

[32:05] Dan saw that sometimes his pictures worked; other times, they didn’t. Some pictures are processed easily, and some pictures confuse. Dan explains the six brain pathways for images: What, How Much, Where, When, How, and Why.

[36:21] To sell a safer car, draw a car, an accident rate chart, a map, a timeline, a flowchart, and a smart car, in that sequence. [41:10] Prepare 75% of your presentation ahead, let the client provide 25% of the thinking and visualizing process. Ask, can you mark here what you think is the the most important thing? Practice the presentation and the pictures first. Never wing it.

February 20, 2017

How to Network for Authentic Connections. With Jeff Beals. #386

Joining me once again on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest Jeff Beals, a sales speaker and author, and Vice President of a major real estate company. Jeff was also the guest on Episode 056 of Accelerate! Among the many topics that Jeff and I discuss are, Jeff’s multiple current jobs, the biggest challenge to salespeople in 2017, how to connect with prospects, how to do networking effectively, whether in person, or digitally, and what you should allow on your own social media.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[1:06] Jeff is a sales author, speaker, and strategist, who trains and speaks all over the world. His second job is VP of Sales and Marketing for a Midwest commercial real estate firm. He also does a weekly business radio show.

[3:30] Cutting through the clutter is the single biggest challenge facing salespeople in 2017. It’s getting harder and harder to reach people where they live and work.

[4:20] Jeff believes in grassroots selling — making connections with people at home or at work. Marketing is at a disadvantage compared to face-to-face interactions by salespeople.

[5:35] Jeff advises reps who use phone and email marketing, (1) to be exceptionally interesting, and (2) to be other-focused. [6:55] The demands on salespeople are not decelerating at all, while the difficulty of reaching contacts is accelerating. Any big data you have, your competitor probably has it, too.

[7:45] Jeff started selling 30 years ago, face-to-face, and by phone. The ability to know how to behave in a networking space can really help you do business in 2017. People crave the personal touch, if it is relevant and interesting to them.

[8:55] Andy’s trend prediction for 2017, is to start seeing the return of the human element in sales. The last mile of the sale is connecting from the data pipe into the client’s needs.

[10:44] Andy mentions Susan RoAne’s How to Work a Room, as a bestselling guide to networking. People know networking is key. Networking benefits Jeff, in both his careers.

[14:20] The goals of networking: clearly state in your mind the desired outcomes — “I’m going to get a prospect, or at least a very good lead on an opportunity, and I want to get valuable information, and meet valuable people, to further my goals.

[20:03] Use the Rule of Thirds. Spend ⅔ of the time with any one person asking about them and their interests, and ⅓ of the time on your own self-marketing expertise. People are self-obsessed; give them a fascinating reason to think of you.

[27:06] Always go to a networking event by yourself. Since that might be challenging, fill your mind with a vision of success. Act the part of a successful networker. Decide to be outgoing. You will incorporate those traits into your personality.

[30:33] Facebook and Twitter impact your personal brand. Don’t post anything there that your customers won’t like. Post photos and things, even family items, that will make you look good in front of your clients.

February 19, 2017

How to Build Your Winning Brand. With Kraig Kleeman.

Joining me for the second time, on this special episode of Accelerate! is Kraig Kleeman, author, speaker, consultant, expert on cold calling and prospecting to the C-suite. He has a brand new book out, called A Winning Brand, on personal branding. Kraig tells how he built his brand by claiming the moniker, The World’s Greatest Cold Caller. Find out more in this episode, and in A Winning Brand!

SUMMARY

An effective personal brand is a prerequisite to success. Your brand transmits who you are, through a series of digital assets, to your audience. Kraig’s book provides a simple recipe you can use to create your personal brand through his Five Core Principles. In this episode we take you on a tour of all five principles and along the way Kraig provides plenty of takeaways you can use right now to start building the brand of You.  

February 18, 2017

How to Align Sales and Marketing for Best Results. With Peter Buscemi. #385

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest Peter Buscemi, Founder of Four Quadrant, LLC. He serves as an advisor and educator to Fortune 1000 companies and startups, and provides go-to-market resources. Among the topics that Peter and I discuss are the connections between sales and marketing roles, and a one-page Sales & Marketing Quick Reference Card that should sit by every telephone in your organization.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[5:32] Where is the dividing line between Sales and Marketing? Where do the SDRs fit? Peter quotes David Packard, “Marketing is much too important to leave to marketers.”

[6:24] Peter says Marketing either builds or maintains a brand, or helps build better products, or helps sell.

[6:58] Demand creation and field marketing functions are best handled by marketing. A salesperson is too expensive to use for development. Carve out tasks for the experts in that area.

[8:48] “Integrated Sales and Marketing” does not want Marketing Qualified Leads. It wants Sales Qualified Leads. The salesperson wants opportunities with high propensity to close.

[10:25] How do you align Sales and Marketing?

[14:16] Why companies need to plan with a longer planning horizon. It takes months between planning for opportunities, engaging them, and closing them.

[18:55] Peter offers a Sales & Marketing Quick Reference Card, to put Sales and Marketing on one page, for a SDR or a BDR to have in front of them on phone calls. It has a positioning statement, opportunity use cases, discovery questions, FAQs.

[28:03] Building a brand and maintaining it are necessary, but those are not sales messages. Sales needs to align with corporate messaging, but focus on client needs. Marketing needs to know sales messaging, to create leads.

 

February 17, 2017

Is Your Process More Important Than Your Prospect? With Bridget Gleason. #384

Welcome to another Front Line Friday with my very special guest and honorary co-host, Bridget Gleason. On this week’s episode, Bridget and I discuss a listener’s question, which leads to an exploration of process and customer engagement.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[:59] A listener asks how we, as sales folks, are to get enough of our prospect’s time to do all the activities required in the sales process. This rep has made thousands of calls.

[2:24] Are we over complicating things with our process? Are we aligning our selling efforts with the way the prospect wants to buy?

[4:59] Bridget wants new reps to follow the process, to show they understand it. She does not want “crazy deviation,” but encourages them to use their brain through the process.

[6:46] Managers should be aware of the process. There is a need for information to qualify a deal, and that the right people are involved in certain calls, with as few steps as possible. A process should have some flexibility; not too much.

[8:28] Science shows a large fraction of buyers want just enough information to make the good enough decision, quickly. Herbert Simon explained most people are satisficers; fewer are maximizers, who want to look deep into the details.

[9:22] Robert Cialdini said people want two things from complex decisions: to be good, and to be gone.

[11:32] Part of the question is, how do I get enough time with the prospect to get all the information I need? The way people get time, is to earn time. Add enough value, early, by email, phone message, social media, to earn trust and time.

[14:28] There has to be a dialog between the reps, and the organization, on what works, and what doesn’t, to refine the process, to align with how the buyer wants to buy.

[17:48] Don’t let “the process” replace coaching and managing your people. Don’t suppose that the process is optimized, so the people are the problem. Coach the people.

[19:18] Be in a continual state of evaluation. People are making a living claiming their methods are absolutely perfect. Be wary. Find something that works, but be mindful, evaluate as you go.

 

February 16, 2017

How to Capture and Record Activities to Optimize Productivity. With Patrick Hogan. #383

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest Patrick Hogan, CEO of Tenfold, a revenue performance platform, based in Austin, Texas. Among the topics that Patrick and I discuss are how Tenfold leverages your technology through a focus on activities to maximize your sales productivity.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[2:10] In 2014, Patrick noticed a data issue in sales: the lax reporting of phone activities. He, with a group of co-founders, came up with a method to capture all activities: The Revenue Performance Platform, Tenfold.

[3:15] SalesForce could be used to capture all activities, if the reps entered them manually. But that is not what sales reps do. Tenfold now does that for them.

[4:56] The subscription revolution is the realization that the true value of a client is not in the initial sale, but in the continuing long-term relationship.

[5:20] If a client calls in with a complaint, and nobody helps  them, they will churn, and their long-term value is diminished. Tenfold deploys to an entire organization by connecting to their existing phone lines, and entering activity into the CRM.

[8:18] Tenfold has two benefits over other systems: since you use your existing phone system, you keep your great voice quality; and since there is no added hardware, you save costs.

[15:27] Tenfold captures data first, and pushes it to the right CRM spaces, then enables list creation, reminders, and simple sequencing.

[17:11] Patrick explains his emphasis on responsiveness. It is a factor of charisma, as studies show. Don’t be slow to respond. When a lead comes in, if no one follows it up in five minutes, it goes out as an email to reps and executives, as a danger flag.

[24:19] Contextual questions and responsiveness, distinguish top salespeople. Habits and behaviors are the keys to success. Get your prospect to the aha moment first. Take them off the market, by eliminating their incentive to talk to others.

February 15, 2017

How to Use An Emissary to Help You Win the Enterprise Sale. With David Hammer. #382

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest David Hammer, Founder and CEO of Emissary.io. Among the topics that David and I discuss are how to tap the knowledge of experts to help you win the complex sale, how Emissary.io matches emissaries to sales organizations seeking enterprise insights, and today’s state of the art of complex sales methodology.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[1:12] Emissary is a platform to unlock people’s knowledge for sales.

[3:25] Emissary taps knowledge employees as emissaries and then matches them to sales organizations who can utilize the information to build relationships with stakeholders and win deals. Every emissary has direct knowledge of decision-makers.

[7:18] The Emissary program starts with a client that has an enterprise opportunity. Emissary.io matches emmissaries to the client’s opportunity.

[7:37] Individual emissaries provide intelligence and support throughout the course of the deal. They do not replace the sales professional.

[11:33] Emissaries are recruited and screened for their currency of knowledge.

[12:50] Andy recalls a multi-million deal where he could have used an emissary. The prospect was using them as a stalking-horse, to get a better price from the current vendor.

[15:25] Richard Ruff was the guest on Accelerate, Episode 114. David requotes Richard: “The key thing about account-based selling, is that it is resistant to traditional standardization. Every account is its own strategy; its own approach.”

[16:53] Sales automation and mechanization can hinder the art of selling. Andy sees a trend in 2017 of a return to a focus on the human element in selling. The science supports the art, but without the human art, the science is weak.

[26:14] David says emissaries provide valuable context for complex deals that sales can’t obtain on its own.