Accelerate Podcast with Andy Paul
March 20, 2017

Put the Customer First to Close More Sales Faster. With Jeff Shore. #410

Joining me once again on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest Jeff Shore, President and CEO of Shore Consulting, and author of multiple books, including Closing 2.0: How to Close More Sales Faster by Putting the Customer First.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[:54] Shore Consulting works with companies in the B2C space. They started in real estate, and have branched into other consumer areas, always focusing on the emotion-based sale.

[4:14] Jeff explains how his new book, Closing 2.0, answers current questions on serving the customer’s buying journey.

[7:38] What are two filters a salesperson applies when reading a sales technique book?

[8:46] Jeff explores the meaning of ‘closing.’ What word would he have chosen instead of ‘closing’? What is the buyer’s ‘decision-making rhythm’?

[10:30] Jeff discusses aspects of service and respect in the seller-customer relationship.

[12:34] On Jeff’s book tour, when he asked audiences to describe ‘a salesperson,’ how did they respond? How did they then describe people they know personally, who sell?

[14:12] Can a salesperson apply skills that are contrary to their authentic personality? How does a salesperson align behaviors and skills to core values?

[15:58] What does Jeff mean by ‘agreement’? Who makes agreements, and what do the agreements accomplish?

[19:24] How would you reverse-engineer your sales process to align with the buyer’s preferences? Jeff makes a suggestion.

[21:34] What is the highest predictor of urgency in a buying decision? What is the role of future promise?

[27:29] What factors should be evaluated and incorporated into the closing process?

[28:51] Should your closing question be well-crafted?

 

March 19, 2017

How to Be an Ultra High Performer. With Jeb Blount. #Special

Jeb Blount is the CEO of Sales Gravy, a keynote speaker, sales acceleration strategist, and author of a great new book, Sales EQ: How Ultra High Performers Leverage Sales-Specific Emotional Intelligence to Close the Complex Deal.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[:48] In addition to being CEO of Sales Gravy, Jeb has written eight books. In 2016, he spent 270 days traveling to speak. He trains and coaches salespeople to accelerate their results.

[2:05] Jeb explains how he wrote a book while traveling. He uses time blocking. He flies first class, to make the airplane his office. He passionately enjoys what he does.
[4:57] Sales EQ comes from Jeb’s 20-year search for what makes the top 1% into ultra high performers. He found they work only on high-probability sales, and they have a great EQ.

[8:51] How do both introverts and extroverts excel at sales? Jeb explains how each can use ‘dual process’ to stand in the stakeholders’ shoes, while keeping in mind their own outcome for the deal. Ultra high performers use dual process.

[12:03] Jeb discusses the psychology of the sales process. A sales process is a linear system designed around the way a buyer’s irrational brain makes decisions, and it must sync with the prospect’s existing buying and decision-making processes.

[18:10] Jeb tells of his experiences working with salespeople in various sectors, who worked either with, or without, using big data. Salespeople need to get out of their own way.

[21:03] Jeb gives a case study of a $4 Billion company with an average inside sale of $50K. Most reps relied highly on email, but the ultra high performers mainly called people.

[24:14] The ultra high performers who spent 80% of their time calling people had empowered themselves by managing their disruptive emotions. They overcame call reluctance. Salespeople are empowered to talk to people. They must do it.

[27:21] Jeb lays out some steps to becoming an ultra high performer. Begin with managing your disruptive emotions. Overcome your fear of engaging people. Jeb describes the factors of sales EQ and the sales process.

[31:11] Jeb talks about self-awareness. He recommends a peer review, and a coach. Ask for specific feedback from leaders. Sales EQ informs about cognitive biases, and ‘goal sheeting.’

[34:46] How do you encourage your thirst for learning? Jeb talks about four intelligences in sales. Acquired Intelligence depends only on you. There is always something to learn!

 

March 17, 2017

Books to Help You Sell. With Bridget Gleason. #408

Bridget Gleason is VP of Sales for Logz.io and my regular guest on Front Line Fridays.

KEY TAKEAWAYS
[:52] The topic is books! The first is Draw to Win: A Crash Course on How to Lead, Sell, and Innovate With Your Visual Mind, by Dan Roam. Dan was on Episode 387 of Accelerate! The book tells how to describe ideas using stick figures and shapes.
[3:12] One of Bridget’s clients consults businesses for conflict resolution, by visualizing with Legos. Visualization works!
[5:11] Dan Roam has found that his conversion rate on proposals improved substantially by using drawing, and by involving the prospect in the presentation, to co-create value.
[6:45] Search Inside Yourself: The Unexpected Path to Achieving Success, Happiness (and World Peace), by Chade-Meng Tan, teaches internal conditions for success, and to reduce stress.
[9:36] Everydata: The Misinformation Hidden in the Little Data You Consume Every Day, by John H. Johnson, is about the common misuse of statistics and data. This affects sales metrics. Don’t confuse correlation with causation! John is an upcoming guest!
[12:47] Shoe Dog: A Memoir by the Creator of Nike, by Phil Knight. This reveals the perseverance, courage, and resilience of the founder behind the iconic brand. The rise wasn’t easy!
[14:59] The Science of Selling: Proven Strategies to Make Your Pitch, Influence Decisions, and Close the Deal, by David Hoffeld, an upcoming guest, summarizing research on the mind, influence, and sales, into a methodology for prospecting.
[17:22] The Coaching Habit: Say Less, Ask More & Change the Way You Lead Forever, by Michael Bungay Stanier is about behavior change, through the science of the way habits are formed.
[19:56] How To Sell On LinkedIn: 30 Tips in 30 Days, by
Erik Qualman tells about good selling behaviors on LinkedIn. It is one of the better books on the topic that Andy has read.
[22:04] Historical fiction! Bernard Cornwell has written several series, including the Saxon Tales, starting with The Last Kingdom, in 9th Century England, which sets the stage for the unification of England.

March 15, 2017

Hurdle the Barriers to Your Sales Success. With Ralph Barsi. #406

Ralph Barsi, Senior Director, Global Demand Center for ServiceNow.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[:53] Ralph oversees the worldwide sales development at ServiceNow. His teams work to feed the top of the funnel.

[3:20] Ralph explains how he engages gatekeepers.

[4:57] ServiceNow started in San Diego, streamlining IT service workflow. They have expanded their offering, worldwide, to all business units within the enterprise.

[7:41] Gartner claims that in 2015, 70% of IT decisions were made outside of IT. How does this influence the sales process?

[8:40] What are the five major barriers to a sale?

[9:17] Ralph discusses how to help reps overcome obscurity. How do you maintain your LinkedIn profile? Ralph credits Jamie Shanks and his company for branding help.

[13:44] Ralph suggests looking at your market carefully, and setting up profiles with pertinent stories and metrics.

[16:04] Technology enables connection, but it distracts in the moment. What behavioral example should leaders set for smartphone use?

[21:00] What does Ralph ask his organization to do each week on LinkedIn, and social media? How can the smartphone help, and how can it hinder?

[22:14] What did Ralph learn about action, from Tony Robbins’ RPM model? How do Ralph’s team leaders incentivize behaviors and outcomes? What flexibilities do they have?

[29:34] Ralph talks about Steve Richards and Call Camp. How is conversation flow a problem with reps? What about scripts and being present in conversation? How does small talk apply?

[35:55] When is the right time to sharpen your craft, and better your game? What do you choose to do with leisure time? Take charge of your career path.

March 14, 2017

How To Rock Your Personal Brand on LinkedIn. With Viveka von Rosen. #405

Viveka von Rosen is a social selling expert, and author of a brand new book, LinkedIn: 101 Ways to Rock Your Personal Brand, Grow Your Network, and Build Your Business.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[:57] A LinkedIn specialist, Viveka writes about, talks about, and consults about, ways to help make LinkedIn work better for people. She is an expert in lead generation, social selling and social marketing on LinkedIn.

[4:28] Viveka stresses the importance of your personal brand and to separate it from the brand of your employer. Your brand always stays with you, regardless of your job.

[5:32] Building a personal brand is creating an online presence so that when people research you, your unique profile comes up. Add thought leadership in your area of expertise, with content. This strategy applies to sales, and career positioning.

[9:01] If your LinkedIn profile dates back to the day you found LinkedIn, and you haven’t updated it since, when potential buyers or employers see it, they will assume it is your personal brand. Differentiate yourself, with expertise you have now.

[10:37] Andy’s book Zero-Time Selling establishes that how you sell, starts with how you differentiate yourself to the customer. Who are you right now, to your target audience? What is the value to them in your brand? Re-engage them by asking.

[14:26] Viveka gives keys to being memorable. Add a background image, in your colors, with your tagline, message and expertise. Strengthen your professional headline. Say in 120 characters who you are, what you do, and whom you serve.

[18:19] Publish, in LinkedIn’s publishing platform, whether it be your own content, or, if you are not a content creator, curated content in your area of expertise. Content should all reflect the purchaser’s persona; their interests, and points of pain.

[24:14] Only use your last name in the last name field. LinkedIn can hide your profile if you put a descriptor there. Anything besides your last name violates the user agreement.

[25:12] Do your summary first in word processing, to catch errors, typos, etc., and add bullets and minor formatting. You can use 2,000 characters. Paste it into LinkedIn. Focus on solving the client persona’s key point of pain. Engage them.

[27:05] Viveka says to put contact info in the header background image, summary section, and the contact me section. If you use a unique phone number or email, then you can track what business is coming from LinkedIn.

[28:54] Your brand is what you stand for, in business. Leave politics and religion out. Share stories of the type of leadership  you represent, that would engage your key customers. Your languaging and content are part of your brand.

[29:43] By not publishing, you show to prospective clients a lack of curiosity and passion about your expertise. This is bad for your brand. Use a post from LinkedIn, or use linkedIn.com/bookmarklet. Or use Google alerts for content.

 

February 27, 2017

How to Climb to the Top in Any Sales Organization. With Lee Bartlett. #392

Lee Bartlett, is a sales expert, entrepreneur, and author of a new book titled, The No. 1 Bestseller.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[1:25] Lee wrote The No. 1 Bestseller as his interpretation of sales excellence — what top salespeople do differently from their colleagues and their competition.

[2:03] The book tells how a salesperson uses sales skills with a mindset and strategy, to work themselves consistently to the top of a sales organization.

[5:09] In Lee’s view, sales statistics can be viewed different ways, but there’s only one way to view a paycheck.

[7:01] Lee always aligned his expectations with those of the company. The company wanted $X million of new business; Lee calculated his sales and agreed on his salary to produce his part. Everyone was aligned, and they went to work.

[9:22] Lee worked both enterprise sales, and very high-value transactional sales, and the sales processes were always defined. Lee looked at the top salesperson to see how they worked.

[12:22] Lee asked customers how they wanted to be sold to, and then he aligned with their expectations.

[15:18] In his book Lee describes the level of preparation and responsiveness he applied to win these deals. In one year he won over 90% of the deals he pitched, with a product similar to competing products.

[17:55] Lee applied quantification to as many of the parts as possible, and built a strategy to be able to handle any situation.

[18:37] Lee explains “the magic” of a boardroom sales pitch. There is a difference in how a salesperson approaches, and adapts to the situation, depending on their ability to “read the room,” and engage with the influencers.

[20:49] In the pitch, behaviors and habits matter more than skills. Lee ended a pitch by pledging to help them through problems that may come up.

[24:05] Lee looked for new products, to be early in a business, and build it up, with a contribution to the culture of that product. Being involved with the right product that suited his personality was intrinsic to over achieving his goals.

[27:06] Lee didn’t personally work with scripting for cold calls. The minute someone took him off the script with a question, he would panic. So he learned the product, and internalized the message, which allowed an engaged dialog.

February 25, 2017

How to Differentiate Yourself by Building Your Authority. With Mike Saunders. #391

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest Mike Saunders, an authority marketing strategist, talk show host on The Business Innovators’ Radio Network, and author of Authority Selling: Opening More Doors to Closing More Business. The main topic we discuss is authority selling, and how small business owners, entrepreneurs and sales professionals can increase their influence by building their authority.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[:53] Mike teaches marketing strategy at three universities. He also has a digital agency, Marketing Huddle, with a focus on marketing and sales with a strategy of authority positioning, or gaining attention from your audience for your product.

[2:16] Grand Canyon U., Colorado Christian U., and Cardinal Stritch U. are the three universities where Mike teaches marketing strategy, brand management, and “Marketing 101.” Mike just surpassed 140 episodes of his radio show.

[3:44] Small business owners, entrepreneurs, and sales professionals are the audience for Mike’s book. Every business person has something to sell. The book focuses on authority in your niche. Trust and credibility build up to authority.

[6:12] Mike doesn’t imply having an international reputation, like Grant Cardone, as the basis for authority. In your network, be the (fill in the blank) expert, to build authority. Support your tribe, as Seth Godin teaches.

[8:33] Chet Holmes’ Ultimate Sales Machine says that 3% of the market is ready to buy, but many more will buy in the near future. In either case, you have a buyer, and you want to stand out in their minds, with authority positioning assets.

[10:32] The expertise gap can be the space between the customer’s product knowledge and the facts. It also means a sales person’s lack of confidence in their own authoritative expertise for the product, even when they legitimately have it.

[12:15] Sellers need to acknowledge the buyer’s distractions. When buyers are compelled to action, they still need to choose between purchase choices. Make your website landing page professional and expert. That makes sales easier.

[14:25] An authority positioning portfolio is a collection of assets establishing your expertise. It could be a thumb drive with you logo on it, and your website, a proposal, and recent projects in it for a client’s review. It can be on your website.

[15:40] Include media mentions, podcast, radio, or TV interviews — anywhere you are visible in your industry; maybe a book you wrote. When people peruse it, it is convincing. Your competitor probably has nothing similar.

[18:57] Instead of starting with a big media outlet, get on a relevant podcast, connect with a local business reporter, write a business development book. Get social proof, such as testimonials and reviews. Have a structure to seek these.

[28:03] Mike’s approach to tie together content marketing and SEO: compile 10 FAQs and answers, and 10 Should Be Asked Questions and answers, and discuss three of them on one podcast. It drives traffic both to your site and the podcast.

 

February 3, 2017

How to Accelerate Your Sales into 2017. With Bridget Gleason. #372

Welcome to another Front Line Friday with my very special guest (and Front Line Friday co-host), Bridget Gleason, VP of Sales for Logz.io.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[1:43] Bridget likes to finish with the panic before the end of the year. The last two weeks of the year, reps say, “I don’t have anything else to close this quarter.” Bridget says, “So start building up to where you need to be for the next quarter.”

[2:56] By the end of January, Bridget likes reps to be well on the way to meeting their first quarter goals. As VP of Sales, Bridget needs to have the year’s structure — territories, hiring, ramping — all set, to focus on the year’s success.

[4:45] Bridget sometimes postpones personnel issues until the new year, to focus on finishing the year well, but, as soon as possible in the year, has that difficult conversation.

[6:08] Andy says to have those conversations back in October or November — because the problem is evident by then — so you have the team composition in place that you need by January.

[7:01] In sales, the data identifies there’s something that’s not working. Millennials in particular, would like ongoing feedback. If managers provide feedback often and early, then the final conversation isn’t as difficult, because it’s not a surprise.

[8:58] Andy wants to see successes in January — milestones, closes, shared successes — to build team confidence. It is crucial to keep the team motivated.

[12:20] Angela Duckworth’s, Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance, says great performers are often made by the team, as opposed to great players making the team great. Bridget wants a team that makes people better for being on it.

[13:13] Andy believes a team gives you more people to hold you accountable, because no one wants to let their teammates down. Everybody wants to contribute.

[15:30] Bridget ‘feels that in spades,’ about her company, Logz.io. Team accountability applies not only to sales professionals, but to all levels of a company. It’s a mesh.

[16:35] What has inspired Bridget recently? Angela Duckworth’s book on grit, teaches that intelligence matters, but if others are smarter than we are, we can do a lot to counter that by persistence, and by hard work.

[18:19] Bridget shares a story of a personal sacrifice made by one of her managers, with quiet determination, to help close out the big year-end deals. Some sacrifices are needed and appreciated, without apparent martyrdom attached.

[23:05] In the first month, pay attention to what’s going on; get early successes for the team; and deal with problems, regardless of sunk cost, whether personnel, or projects that will never close. Take a hard look at everything.

January 6, 2017

How to Get Motivated for 2017 (and beyond.) With Bridget Gleason. #348

Welcome to the year’s first episode of Front Line Friday with my remarkable guest, Bridget Gleason. On this week’s episode, Bridget and I discuss, among other topics, looking forward to the new challenges of the new year, how motivation — the why — underlies all action, great principles we’ve picked up from books we’ve read, and  what managers need to know about their team members to help them succeed in 2017.

December 15, 2016

How to Sell More in Less Time. With Jill Konrath. #331

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is my friend Jill Konrath. Jill is a speaker, sales expert, and author of multiple bestselling books, including Selling to Big Companies, Snap Selling, Agile Selling, and her latest book, More Sales, Less Time. Among the many topics that Jill and I discuss are how she came to focus on selling more in less time, what she learned from her research about concentration, focus and how to eliminate distraction that waste selling time, how to make the most of the limited hours available each, and how you can take the More Sales, Less Time Challenge.