Accelerate Podcast with Andy Paul
June 24, 2017

#493. How To Build Your No Sweat Elevator Pitch. With Fred Miller.

Fred Miller, author of the new book, The No Sweat Elevator Speech!: How to Craft YOUR Elevator Speech Floor by Floor, with No Sweat! joins me on this episode of #Accelerate!

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[1:22] No Sweat is Fred Miller’s tagline. He started with No Sweat Public Speaking, in 2011, and kept the brand.

[2:21] An elevator speech is a personal infomercial. Use the time before or after events to network. The elevator speech is a good start. It can also be used to begin a presentation. It must be a clear self-description.

[6:25] An elevator speech is not a sales pitch. It sorts and sifts between future customers and disqualified contacts, saving time for both parties. Fred’s presentation included an assurance of the value he delivers.

[12:09] Fred’s speech is in the format of an elevator ride by floor. The first floor is give your name. Second floor is describe what you do in threes. Fred’s three are that he is a speaker, coach, and author. Items in threes seem complete.

[17:15] Fred lists his three by the money piece, the passion piece, and a related choice. Speaker, coach, and author follow that pattern.

[19:48] Third floor is a description of your experience. You want someone to easily understand what you do, in simple terms. If you’re published, tell the topic of your last book, or your upcoming book. Or tell how long you’ve been in business.

[23:54] Fourth floor is ‘what,’ “Businesses, individuals, and organizations hire me because…” In Fred’s case it’s, “because they want to improve their networking, public speaking, and presentation skills.” Delivery trumps content.

[27:04] Fifth floor is your why. Fred continues his speech, “They do that because they know speaking opportunities are business, career, and leadership opportunities.” The why is critical. If there is no agreement, the presentation concludes.

[28:07] Fred’s sixth floor is, “They also know we perceive really good speakers as experts.” Seventh floor is the unique selling proposition, “I show them how to develop, practice, and deliver a ‘knock your socks off’ presentation, with no sweat.”

[29:32] Eighth floor is the ‘ask,’ “What do the folks at your place do about networking, public speaking, and presentation skills training?” Fred has a suggestion for starting a formal speech. There is flexibility when you move the pieces around by floor.

[30:50] The No Sweat elevator speech is a methodical process to encapsulate what you can do for the person you are talking to. It is flexible, and it is not pitching a product, but presenting yourself as an expert professional. Also have a short version.

[35:29] The elevator speech requires preparation and practice. Give people something of value for their investment of time in you. Record yourself practicing, and watch yourself video only,  audio only, and with both. Then show someone, for feedback.

June 23, 2017

#492. Are You Prepared to Achieve Your Career Goals? With Bridget Gleason.

Bridget Gleason is VP of Sales for Logz.io and my regular partner on Front Line Fridays.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[2:30] The topic is assessing where you are as an individual contributor, where you want to go, and the next step to get there. Bridget talks about assessment, in context of life goals.

[4:13] An SDR position is usually of short duration. It is critical for an SDR to think ahead. Millennials sometimes have a hard time seeking out mentors. Bridget recommends having a mentor who is not your manager, to gain a different perspective.

[6:25] Prospecting for a mentor is like prospecting for customers. They need a pitch and a value proposition. For Andy, some reps have approached him indirectly, leading with questions, to build a relationship, without assuming familiarity.

[7:39] Earn the trust, and the right to ask the next level of question. The first person you talk to may not be the mentor that aligns with you. Enjoy the interaction of the time together, but be willing to be challenged. You need to be open to learning.

[9:18] The next step is to develop a point of view of what sales means for you. Formulate a philosophy — who you are in sales and what you stand for, to see the next step of your career. Your POV will change in time. A mentor helps with this.

[12:36] In tech, there’s always a new bright shiny object, and people rushing from one company to the next. Having a POV puts you in position to find a company aligned with you, so you know what you can offer them to engage in their success.

[13:45] An SDR may learn the steps to become an AE, CSM, or account manager. An AE can prepare for the enterprise side, or large enterprise, or to become a manager. Bridget suggests a gap analysis between you and your goal, including skills.

[16:43] Start by asking for feedback from your manager. You need to know where you stand. Even if there is personal friction, they can still be your ally for success. Peer feedback and mentor feedback is also helpful.

[18:15] Start reading books that will develop your business acumen, biographies of leaders, and broaden your worldview. Career progression involves additional responsibilities, so additional knowledge and a broader perspective is needed.

[20:52] A listener sent Andy a link to an article in which a CIO says he wants to hire people who understand human behavior — who have read Shakespeare. Andy suggests looking for opinions diametrically opposed to yours, and reading them.

[23:32] Some NYT readers are infuriated that there is a conservative columnist writing for the paper. For every POV, there is an opposing POV. Although it is a challenge, be open to learning about them. There is not only one way to sell.

[28:35] Sales leadership starts with the individual contributor. Andy cites Lolly Daskal’s book, and says, never stop learning. Consciously assess where you are, where are you strong, and where are you deficient?

June 14, 2017

#484. What’s Your One Word? With Evan Carmichael.

Evan Carmichael, Author of the new book, Your One Word, joins me for the second time on this episode of #Accelerate!

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[2:42] Your one word is the one core value you stand for, more important than the others. When you identify it, you can build a life, and a sales career, that is on point, and is much more purposeful than reacting to others’ agendas for you.

[3:08] Beyond food, clothing, and shelter, people need to have meaning. People want to do work that has impact and is meaningful to others.

[3:54] Today, we have more models to follow, to be our own boss, and to get the results we want to get. Being an entrepreneur is not only easier, but sometimes necessary.

[5:04] Your one word comes from you, first. What do you represent as a human being, and how will you bring that to your business? It has to come from an authentic place, so you can make real connections with people, and stand out to win.

[6:58] Evan describes how his life evolved as an entrepreneur in a way that led him to write the book. It was his personal journey. First he thought changing the tagline of his company would help. Then he realized he had to find what he stood for.

[8:31] Evan’s one word is Belief. He then added the credo: Self-confidence, Passion, and Conviction. He recommends everyone to go through this exercise. Once he did this, every project he touched took off, and had success, and intention.

[10:41] This is the connection salespeople need with their buyers. It starts with how you stand out with your values. Evan goes to Starbucks because he loves Howard Schultz’s values.

[12:25] Product value has to be in context of core values. Even talks about a landscaper who “treats every lawn like it’s my Mom’s lawn.” Evan would hire that landscaper, just from that.

[18:51] Your one word is always something positive. There’s a piece of good in everyone. Find your good word. When you hire, lead with the value. Attract people who have like values.

[22:14] Evan tells a story about ‘the fat kid’ Nike ad, which he calls their best ad ever. It takes greatness to start. It’s what you see in yourself, that gets you started, that matters.

[26:24] Evan lives by Henry Ford’s statement, “Whether you believe you can or you can’t, you’re right.” Think of the quotes you love. Those will help you find your core value. Evan likes learning from successful people.

[28:37] Your one word is forever, not a 2017 resolution. What’s the one lesson you want to pass on to your children? Think about the happiest things of your life, the people who helped. Find common threads. Distill them to a value.

May 20, 2017

#463. Leading Through the Turn. With Elise Mitchell.

Elise Mitchell, CEO of Mitchell Communications Group, and CEO of Dentsu Aegis Public Relations Network, as well as the author of a very interesting book, Leading Through the Turn: How a Journey Mindset Can Help Leaders Find Success and Significance, joins me on this episode of #Accelerate!

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[2:20] Leading Through the Turn looks at leadership as though riding a motorcycle. She started riding with her husband 10 years ago, and never looked back. She was hooked. Today she rides a Honda CBR300R — sleek, red, and fast.

[4:10] Key concepts are a destination philosophy and a journey perspective. The journey matters as much as the destination. Elise is naturally a destination person. She says her strength of entrepreneurship became a weakness as she hit extremes.

[5:35] Elise had to rethink how she was sacrificing important aspects of life to reach the destination of success. Motorcycling became the catalyst to make her rethink her journey. Now she savors it.

[7:28] Elise explains her drive was pushing her to burnout. She was missing many experiences. She wasn’t investing in living.

[9:09] Elise learned to ‘scrap the map,’ when the family moved away from her large corporate job. She had to decide if she would go, and be bitter, or go, and let change make her better.

[11:40] We can’t, and shouldn’t, control everything. Elise discusses adaptive leadership, about learning to solve new problems in real time, where there is no clear answer.

[13:00] Elise warns against building a company around a leader. She illustrates with a personal anecdote about letting go of control, and delegating — the entrepreneur’s challenge!

[16:09] Every step of leadership feels a little scary if you are ambitious, and want to grow and challenge yourself as a leader, and broaden your impact. Don’t let fear hold you back.

[17:41] A spirit of reciprocity is thinking outside yourself. Elise has a personal professional anecdote. She asked other leaders, “What can I do for you?” She cites Give and Take.

The Go-Giver is in the same vein. Help first.

[21:56] The called leader vs. the accidental leader. Elise has strived for leadership since her childhood. Accidental leaders have circumstances thrust upon them. If you have the heart of an explorer, it doesn’t matter how you got there. Go with it.

[26:41] The higher calling of leadership is to determine what good can you do as a leader. Can you create significance in the lives of others? You have so much potential to open doors.

[28:38] Leadership and significance starts with the individual. Elise discards the grandiosity of philanthropism for doing the right things, one at a time — changing that one person’s life for good; helping that customer further their opportunities.

April 17, 2017

#434. How to Live a Life of Significance and Intention. With Larry Broughton.

Larry Broughton, an award-winning entrepreneur, CEO, bestselling author, keynote speaker, and mentor to other entrepreneurs, joins me on this episode of #Accelerate!

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[:42] Larry has a variety of experiences — martial arts, Green Beret, motel night auditor, entrepreneur, speaker, and leadership coach. He is the CEO and owner of Broughton Hotels with 20 properties currently, and a goal of 80 in 2020.

[4:04] Some people seek success. Don’t chase success — be a great person, and live a life of significance. When you significantly impact your family, community, and investors, success is the by-product. Live a life of meaning, with a ‘why.’

[6:33] Build relationships. People want to do business with people they know, like, and trust. We tend to like and trust people living a life of significance and serving, more than we like those who just take.

[8:09] When you meet someone, find out how you can serve them. Be vulnerable. Larry learned in the Army to do the hard right, over the easy wrong. Success is just outside your comfort zone. There’s just one way to coast, and it’s downhill!

[9:48] Larry is a painful introvert. So he gets psyched up, and takes a wing person, and they play off each other. Larry uses small talk to break the ice, instead of talking business. It is clear if someone is assessing whether you’re worth their time.

[11:06] Sometimes the person you meet is not a good business fit for you, but you might know someone who can help them. Larry likes LinkedIn for the degrees of connection. Larry likes to build the know, like, and trust factor. Smile!

[15:38] Gordon Gekko did not get it right. The world is not a reward for greed. The competitive approach to success is hollow. Collaborative success is best. Larry elaborates on this.

[16:56] Larry believes that things are going to work out in the world, and what he can control is his own positive energy, and the way he responds to the world. Salespeople with positive energy are much more attractive.

[18:48] Larry speaks of 12 Keys to Greatness, including traits such as awareness, authenticity, being centered, gratitude, meditation, intentionality, loving self and others, self affirmations, talismans (symbols of accomplishment), etc.

[25:42] Jealousy comes from fear. There is enough opportunity, success, wealth, recognition for everyone. Larry’s daily affirmations helped him bless people he envied, until he could appreciate them. Good vibes come back to you.

[29:00] Liking goes both ways. When you are authentic, your “like” shows through. Larry’s office has a sign, “Authentic people delivering creative solutions.” The sooner we can be real, the sooner we can like someone, and they can like us.

[32:31] Larry prizes humility. He sees the need for advice. He has a board of advisors for his business, and a board of advisors for his personal life. Be more collaborative than competitive. Do something significant today.

April 15, 2017

#433. Follow Your Own Path to Happiness and Success. With Paul Kortman.

Paul Kortman, Founder of Connex Digital Marketing, and digital nomad, joins me on this episode of #Accelerate!

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[:58] Paul’s understanding of success has shifted. He notes that the American lifestyle does not coincide with Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs. The pull of consumerism is strong in the U.S. The family now lives in Cancun.

[5:04] Paul feels guilty if he’s not working at 9:00 a.m., but there are billions of people who don’t work that way. He wants to do better for his children. He spends more time with them.

[7:52] Paul sold their Michigan house over two years ago, and the family of six flew around the world for a first adventure. They came back at Christmas, reconfigured the business, and bought an RV, and within months, they were living in Mexico.

[9:30] It’s a big RV. The children range from ages four to ten. They still obey! They are also homeschooled. Paul’s wife loves taking their home wherever they go. Living in 330 SF is a challenge. In an RV, you go outdoors more.

[13:33] Paul still manages a digital marketing agency. In Mexico they have unlimited 4G WiFi and data on their phones. They consume 200GB in a month, in streaming. Paul reconfigured his business model, after extreme losses.

[15:43] Most of Paul’s customers come because they know somebody who knows Paul. His network connections were not his clients, but they introduced clients to him. By Paul’s leaving town, his competitor’s business “blew up,” from referrals.

[17:23] Normal churn drained away most of Paul’s agency, and he lost 90% of his revenue. Paul explains what happened.

[18:17] In Paul’s trip back to Michigan, he rewarmed his network, but he was also able to develop a productized service, the “Holy Grail” in the service industry. He offered a simplified service at a flat fee, with no variations. It works.

[20:51] Paul is the only salesperson. Paul still networks. He found the sweet spot of pricing, need, and offer. Paul also says the key of search ranking is to offer quality content, with backlinks. He cites Brian Dean’s skyscraper technique.

[22:30] Skyscraper technique takes a topic that has proven successful, although with inferior content, and improves on the content. Paul explains how he productized that process for customers to double their site traffic in six months.

[26:30] Connex Digital Marketing offers the product at a fixed price per post; you set the number of posts per year. You describe your audience, website, and desired keywords. Paul explains how Connex moves forward from that point.

[30:44] Paul will not work with existing or supplied content. To guarantee the quality, and proven results, Paul has house researchers and writers to control the productized service.

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April 11, 2017

#429. Mold Your Mindset for Success. With Gerhard Gschwandtner.

Gerhard Gschwandtner, Founder and CEO of Selling Power Magazine, and CEO of the Sales 3.0 Conferences, joins me on this episode of #Accelerate!

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[1:00] Gerhard became interested in sales by a chance meeting with a successful salesperson in a coffeehouse in Salzburg. Gerhardt later went from the theater into sales.

[2:56] Gerhard trained sales reps for a multinational French company. He traveled the world, and ended up in the U.S. He started a company, but still traveled. He reveals the reason he started into publishing, and the development of his magazine.

[4:14] Gerhard saw, as he interviewed successful  people, that there is a certain mindset that shapes the salesperson’s skillset. What else is needed, for sales success?

[7:41] The key to mindset is your inner CEO, or the prefrontal cortex of the brain, that has the power of awareness, and performs executive functions.

[9:17] No-limit thinking is about expecting to succeed. You change your belief systems about your ability, by what you tell yourself.

[10:51] Gerhard interviewed Cal Ripken Jr. (2,632 consecutive MLB games) who has a strong work ethic, shows up, and is committed to be the best he can be. He learned early, the path to success. Gerhardthelps people to envision their success.

[13:50] You have about 60K thoughts a day, with 80% of them negative. Gerhard suggests ways that an accountability partner can help. He also discusses the cadence of success and internal boosts you can give yourself.

[15:34] There are levels of mindset. Gerhard describes them, and how they can be changed. The mindset is your garden, so stop watering the weeds, just water the flowers. Gerhardt offers steps to work with mindset.

[19:42] Good examples can inspire you and help you get over your fears. Gerhardt gives a case study of Bob Carr, Founder of Heartland Payment Systems, whose father left when Bob was 13. Bob started studying U.S. Presidents for guidance.

[22:47] Gerhard encourages putting structure to the dream, and finding your success mentor. Ask. You are not alone, and life is much easier when you have a good support system. People do want to help each other.

[25:18] Technology is mindless. It accelerates everything, but we need to keep in mind that sales is a people business, not a technology business. Pick up the phone and call someone!

[29:28] Neuroscience and psychology are revealing amazing things that are possible. Looking at the science, Gerhardt has assembled 12 modalities into one course that can take you higher than simply “positive thinking.” It can be life-changing.

March 13, 2017

Push Your Limits to Achieve the Impossible. With Dan Waldschmidt. #404

Dan Waldschmidt, is a keynote speaker, business strategist, ultra runner, business owner and author of Edgy Conversations: How Ordinary People Can Achieve Outrageous Success.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[:53] Dan speaks to clients on ways to grow and dynamically scale ideas into massive money-makers. He also writes about concerns he faces and addresses in his own businesses.

[1:54] Dan pushes against what is “impossible,” by pushing limits — personally, with running; professionally, by strategizing to make “millions and billions” of dollars; and with clients, helping them to see the world differently, and to excel.

[2:30] Dan’s ultra-running goal for 2017 is to run another few thousand miles, in 100- and 50-mile races, and maybe a 200-mile race. Running gives him clarity for next steps. Transcendental Meditation and running keep him grounded.

[5:31] How did Dan cope when he wanted to quit, 20 miles into his last 100-mile race in the mountains of Alabama?

[8:14] Days after a race, Dan can reflect, “Dude, you didn’t even know that was possible, and you did it! What else don’t you know is possible, that is next on your list of things to do?”

[9:41] Instead of asking for salesmen to close better, ask why your business isn’t creating a brand or a customer experience so outrageously positive, that deals just automatically close?

[10:15] Dan couldn’t finish one race, because he had depleted his salt. Little things can have a fatal effect when you are trying to perform at a high level. The details matter when you answer the phone and how you brand.

[12:15] What are you prepared to sacrifice? Some people don’t progress because they have too many TV shows lined up to watch. Prioritize time. Your choices control your achievements. Be desperate to meet your goals.

[15:48] To perform at a high level, “burn the ships.” Make a list of five to ten things in your life that you need to burn right now, until you cross your continent and build new ships.

[17:54] To be amazing, you have to talk yourself down from your fears. You can learn not only to survive stressful situations, but to thrive, in spite of what happens around you.

[19:40] Successful people refuse to: excuse their mistakes; copy others (instead of building on their own strengths); or look down on others who are struggling (Dan tells of Jeff Bezos’s many years before Amazon turned a profit).

[27:09] Successful people refuse to: waste time doing things that don’t matter; or let the current chaos distract them from future success.

February 21, 2017

How to Draw to Win. With Dan Roam. #387

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest Dan Roam, President of Digital Roam, bestselling author of multiple books, including, The Back of the Napkin, and the book we’re going to talk about today, Draw to Win. Among the topics that Dan and I discuss are Dan’s history with drawing, Dan’s study of visual processing in the human brain and how it opens the door to greater understanding.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[2:24] Dan has always drawn. In university he studied organic chemistry and painting, and learned the same structural concepts. Dan wanted to push this modeling concept into business. People remember pictures over paragraphs.

[7:07] Dan’s girlfriend was a nanny in the Soviet Union, and got Dan a visa to work there. He worked at a tourist magazine. He stayed seven years, founding the first Western ad agency.

In Russia, Dan communicated largely with pictures.

[12:09] Dan liked working with business people, helping them clarify their ideas. He came back to the U.S., and continued with the same approach. Dan realized early on that a flip chart would help each person understand a deal.

[15:00] Each time Dan’s company did a flipboard pitch, they won; many times even when, by their small size, they shouldn’t have. They were the ones who drew the client a picture.

[16:21] People want a story, and a connection; they want to trust you. We neglect the fact that people would like to see some honest creativity taking place in the actual meeting. [17:57] About ⅓ of your brain by weight is dedicated to vision. Another ⅓ of your brain is dedicated to processing vision along with other sensory input. That leaves ⅓ of your brain for everything else, besides visual processing.

[23:45] Our brains could hold the imagery from 33 million Blu-ray Disc movies. To memorize speeches, assign each thought to a particular visual, in a train of images.

[27:33] You can draw anything, if you can draw a circle, a square, a triangle, a line, a blob, and an arrow. Use stick figures. This is not an artistic process. This is a thinking process. The simpler the visual, the better the communication.

[28:04] It took years of training to learn how to write your name. It takes about five minutes for an adult to learn the process of drawing. Confidence comes with practice. The picture is another tool in your communication toolbelt.

[32:05] Dan saw that sometimes his pictures worked; other times, they didn’t. Some pictures are processed easily, and some pictures confuse. Dan explains the six brain pathways for images: What, How Much, Where, When, How, and Why.

[36:21] To sell a safer car, draw a car, an accident rate chart, a map, a timeline, a flowchart, and a smart car, in that sequence. [41:10] Prepare 75% of your presentation ahead, let the client provide 25% of the thinking and visualizing process. Ask, can you mark here what you think is the the most important thing? Practice the presentation and the pictures first. Never wing it.

January 14, 2017

How You Can Accelerate Your Success in 2017. With Mark Hunter. #355

Welcome to Sales Kick-Off Week on Accelerate!

Joining me on Day Five of the Accelerate! 2017 Virtual Sales Kick-off Week is my guest Mark Hunter.

Mark Hunter is The Sales Hunter. He’s a keynote speaker, sales trainer and author of High-Profit Selling: Win the Sale Without Compromising on Price, and most recently, High-Profit Prospecting: Powerful Strategies to Find the Best Leads and Drive Breakthrough Sales Benefits.

On Day 6, this last day of our 2017 Virtual Sales Kick-off Meeting the focus is squarely on you. And the steps you can take to elevate your professionalism and performance in 2017.

In this episode, Mark lays out his challenges for sales professionals in 2017, including how to put together a personal development plan, how to develop the habit of curiosity, how to create purposeful personal goals, how to hold yourself accountable for achieving your personal goals and much much more.

Want to improve your sales performance in 2017? Start by investing half an hour to learn from Mark Hunter.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[:54] Mark’s 2017 sales resolution is to spend more time with fewer prospects. Who do we prospect? Is a heartbeat enough of a qualification? Mark’s dog has not bought from him, yet.

[2:15] Mark wants social media be one-to-one communication. #SocialMediaWithoutSocialCommunityIsSocialStupidity

[4:50] The number one challenge facing salespeople is to know and accept that their most valuable asset is their time. Use tools to manage your time.

[7:41] Connect with three or four external peers to challenge and motivate each other, to get to the next level. Top performers associate with top performers.

[9:03] Every floor in a building is not the same. Move yourself to the next floor and find a whole level of new opportunities and relationships. It will change your paradigm.

[12:30] What can you do to improve yourself this month or quarter? What can you do to improve yourself over the next five-to-ten years? Mark’s goal is to read a book a week.

[12:51] To read a book a week, Mark will have to: 1) pick up his reading pace, 2) become more focused and retain what he reads, and 3) be able to cut out other activities from his time.

[14:40] Higher-achieving people, while they work out, are listening to podcasts, not to music, to better themselves.

[17:06] Disrupt You!, by Jay Samit, shows that things are changing, and there are incredible opportunities coming, if you open yourself to change, and take advantage of them.

[19:23] Ask your kids everyday, “What did you Google today?” We have to become more curious, and be methodical about it.

[22:50] Curiosity needs to build your knowledge. Have purposeful personal goals. What will you sacrifice to attain your goals? Have an accountability partner who will check in with you.