Accelerate Podcast with Andy Paul
April 27, 2017

#443. What Stands Between You and Your Greatness? With Lolly Daskal.

Lolly Daskal, a leadership executive coach who works with many Fortune 500 CEOs, speaker, and author of the great new book, The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness, joins me on this episode of #Accelerate!

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[2:02] Lolly talks about the greatness within each person. At certain moments it is felt, when the body is energetic, the mind is in flow, and life is in synch.
[5:24] Daniel Pink says, everybody leads. Lolly says, own your leadership — how you impact others, regardless of your title or position — and take responsibility for it.
[6:48] Lolly gives her definition of greatness. It’s about being confident of abilities, loyal, and trustworthy. It has the characteristics of what it means to be successful. She discusses a code of conduct based on core principles.
[8:30] Lolly noticed that her clients complained of seven issues, or human weaknesses. Lolly calls them gaps, that come out when we are stressed. She identifies archetypes, as taught by Carl Jung, pairing them against opposing gaps.
[12:31] If we’re no longer able to change a situation, we have to change ourselves. Lolly uses the acronym RETHINK for the seven archetypes and personas in her book. Rebel, Explorer, Truth Teller, Hero, Inventor, Navigator, and Knight.
[13:39] Lolly asks clients to consider themselves a work in progress. Without progress there is no growth. True leadership means transformation. What did you learn today, so you can be better tomorrow? Nothing stands still.

[14:39] Surround yourself with people smarter than you, so you can learn. Lolly has read a book a day for 27 years, so she can always learn something new. (She skims and retains it.)

[16:48] All of us have all the archetypes within us, and they show up in different kinds of ways, as needed by the situation. [21:56] Clients ask how they can be at the top of their game. Lolly redirects them toward knowing who they are, rather than how they should do things. People tap into who you are, and that’s how they align with you. People buy from who you are.

[24:40] Lolly explains the gap. The Rebel, driven by confidence, has a gap, the Impostor, driven by doubt. Do you want to stand in greatness, which is finding confidence, or do you want to lead with self-doubt? She explains luck is being prepared.

[27:35] Perfection is not real. Lolly substitutes excellence for perfection, by bringing excellence to everything she does. Bringing the best you have, is good enough.

[29:45] Two final thoughts from Lolly: read The Leadership Gap, and get a coach who will ask you questions, to go deeper.

 

April 17, 2017

#434. How to Live a Life of Significance and Intention. With Larry Broughton.

Larry Broughton, an award-winning entrepreneur, CEO, bestselling author, keynote speaker, and mentor to other entrepreneurs, joins me on this episode of #Accelerate!

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[:42] Larry has a variety of experiences — martial arts, Green Beret, motel night auditor, entrepreneur, speaker, and leadership coach. He is the CEO and owner of Broughton Hotels with 20 properties currently, and a goal of 80 in 2020.

[4:04] Some people seek success. Don’t chase success — be a great person, and live a life of significance. When you significantly impact your family, community, and investors, success is the by-product. Live a life of meaning, with a ‘why.’

[6:33] Build relationships. People want to do business with people they know, like, and trust. We tend to like and trust people living a life of significance and serving, more than we like those who just take.

[8:09] When you meet someone, find out how you can serve them. Be vulnerable. Larry learned in the Army to do the hard right, over the easy wrong. Success is just outside your comfort zone. There’s just one way to coast, and it’s downhill!

[9:48] Larry is a painful introvert. So he gets psyched up, and takes a wing person, and they play off each other. Larry uses small talk to break the ice, instead of talking business. It is clear if someone is assessing whether you’re worth their time.

[11:06] Sometimes the person you meet is not a good business fit for you, but you might know someone who can help them. Larry likes LinkedIn for the degrees of connection. Larry likes to build the know, like, and trust factor. Smile!

[15:38] Gordon Gekko did not get it right. The world is not a reward for greed. The competitive approach to success is hollow. Collaborative success is best. Larry elaborates on this.

[16:56] Larry believes that things are going to work out in the world, and what he can control is his own positive energy, and the way he responds to the world. Salespeople with positive energy are much more attractive.

[18:48] Larry speaks of 12 Keys to Greatness, including traits such as awareness, authenticity, being centered, gratitude, meditation, intentionality, loving self and others, self affirmations, talismans (symbols of accomplishment), etc.

[25:42] Jealousy comes from fear. There is enough opportunity, success, wealth, recognition for everyone. Larry’s daily affirmations helped him bless people he envied, until he could appreciate them. Good vibes come back to you.

[29:00] Liking goes both ways. When you are authentic, your “like” shows through. Larry’s office has a sign, “Authentic people delivering creative solutions.” The sooner we can be real, the sooner we can like someone, and they can like us.

[32:31] Larry prizes humility. He sees the need for advice. He has a board of advisors for his business, and a board of advisors for his personal life. Be more collaborative than competitive. Do something significant today.

April 11, 2017

#429. Mold Your Mindset for Success. With Gerhard Gschwandtner.

Gerhard Gschwandtner, Founder and CEO of Selling Power Magazine, and CEO of the Sales 3.0 Conferences, joins me on this episode of #Accelerate!

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[1:00] Gerhard became interested in sales by a chance meeting with a successful salesperson in a coffeehouse in Salzburg. Gerhardt later went from the theater into sales.

[2:56] Gerhard trained sales reps for a multinational French company. He traveled the world, and ended up in the U.S. He started a company, but still traveled. He reveals the reason he started into publishing, and the development of his magazine.

[4:14] Gerhard saw, as he interviewed successful  people, that there is a certain mindset that shapes the salesperson’s skillset. What else is needed, for sales success?

[7:41] The key to mindset is your inner CEO, or the prefrontal cortex of the brain, that has the power of awareness, and performs executive functions.

[9:17] No-limit thinking is about expecting to succeed. You change your belief systems about your ability, by what you tell yourself.

[10:51] Gerhard interviewed Cal Ripken Jr. (2,632 consecutive MLB games) who has a strong work ethic, shows up, and is committed to be the best he can be. He learned early, the path to success. Gerhardthelps people to envision their success.

[13:50] You have about 60K thoughts a day, with 80% of them negative. Gerhard suggests ways that an accountability partner can help. He also discusses the cadence of success and internal boosts you can give yourself.

[15:34] There are levels of mindset. Gerhard describes them, and how they can be changed. The mindset is your garden, so stop watering the weeds, just water the flowers. Gerhardt offers steps to work with mindset.

[19:42] Good examples can inspire you and help you get over your fears. Gerhardt gives a case study of Bob Carr, Founder of Heartland Payment Systems, whose father left when Bob was 13. Bob started studying U.S. Presidents for guidance.

[22:47] Gerhard encourages putting structure to the dream, and finding your success mentor. Ask. You are not alone, and life is much easier when you have a good support system. People do want to help each other.

[25:18] Technology is mindless. It accelerates everything, but we need to keep in mind that sales is a people business, not a technology business. Pick up the phone and call someone!

[29:28] Neuroscience and psychology are revealing amazing things that are possible. Looking at the science, Gerhardt has assembled 12 modalities into one course that can take you higher than simply “positive thinking.” It can be life-changing.

April 8, 2017

#427. Put Purpose to Work in Your Business. With Scott Beebe.

Scott Beebe, Founder and Head Coach of MyBusinessOnPurpose.com, joins me on this episode of #Accelerate!

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[1:32] Scott gives the rundown on his background in football, theology, corporate, church, and an NGO. After his position was dissolved, he hired a business coach, to start his business to liberate small business owners from the chaos of business.

[4:55] Entrepreneurs today find themselves busy playing every role on the team. Instead of planning how to grow, they haven’t even determined where they want to be in three years.

[7:27] Scott cites Michael Gerber’s E-Myth. You need to provide immediate service, while running a company, and always have a vision story for growth.

[10:24] Six months to six years is a good timeframe for a vision story. How does that differ from a goal? Vision requires time for finances, products, and personnel to mature.

[13:05] The vision story is the detailed snapshot picture of what the future looks like. How does it relate to your mission statement?

[14:21] Your vision story, and your unique core values drive your day-to-day decision making.

[14:44] Unique core values are personal to you, beyond the basic core values such as integrity. Scott gives case examples of how core values inform projects.

[16:43] Scott gives an example how one unique core value works ideally for one concrete contractor, but would not work for someone else.

[18:20] Core values also inform prospect and seller whether they are a good match for each other.

[21:14] Core values win deals. Scott gives another example.

[22:43] “[Unique core values] are the curbs along the side of the road you’re taking to get to your vision.” — Scott Beebe

[24:03] Scott explains by an example what kind of case would justify violating your unique core value.

March 27, 2017

The Best Practices for Sales Managers. With Kevin F. Davis #416

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest Kevin F. Davis, President at TopLine Leadership, and author of multiple books, including his latest, The Sales Manager’s Guide to Greatness: Ten Essential Strategies for Leading Your Team to the Top.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[:48] Kevin started selling for Lanier, and moved into their sales management, and then general management.

[7:38] Kevin’s latest book comes from his years of specialized experience at TopLine, presenting skills workshops to groups of sales managers. His book shares what he learned in the process, to provide value to busy sales managers.

[9:25] Sales managers need to stop and rethink their priorities.

[10:21] Executives should evaluate burdens they place on sales managers. What is really important to a sales manager’s success? What happens when they spend time on coaching?

[15:00] Kevin trains sales managers to lead themselves toward more observational sales coaching. Does a sales managers need to be everybody’s problem solver?

[16:37] What are Kevin’s two magic questions to reply to a rep’s request for help? What question should sales managers ask themselves?

[18:12] Sales managers hope that by solving reps’ problems, the reps will make more sales calls. Instead, the reps bring more problems. What happens when you take over for a rep?

[23:53] The most successful people have the greatest difficulty giving up the things that made them successful to begin with. As a sales manager, stop selling. Let your sales reps sell.

[25:58] Kevin discusses underperformance. What two perspectives does Kevin offer for observational coaching?

[28:55] If sales managers can’t define a good attitude, they can’t nurture it. What trait precedes coachability?

[32:40] Kevin talks about counterproductive behaviors of sales management. To build an elite team, which set of reps should be at the focus? Kevin explains about the ‘bell cow.’

March 19, 2017

How to Be an Ultra High Performer. With Jeb Blount. #Special

Jeb Blount is the CEO of Sales Gravy, a keynote speaker, sales acceleration strategist, and author of a great new book, Sales EQ: How Ultra High Performers Leverage Sales-Specific Emotional Intelligence to Close the Complex Deal.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[:48] In addition to being CEO of Sales Gravy, Jeb has written eight books. In 2016, he spent 270 days traveling to speak. He trains and coaches salespeople to accelerate their results.

[2:05] Jeb explains how he wrote a book while traveling. He uses time blocking. He flies first class, to make the airplane his office. He passionately enjoys what he does.
[4:57] Sales EQ comes from Jeb’s 20-year search for what makes the top 1% into ultra high performers. He found they work only on high-probability sales, and they have a great EQ.

[8:51] How do both introverts and extroverts excel at sales? Jeb explains how each can use ‘dual process’ to stand in the stakeholders’ shoes, while keeping in mind their own outcome for the deal. Ultra high performers use dual process.

[12:03] Jeb discusses the psychology of the sales process. A sales process is a linear system designed around the way a buyer’s irrational brain makes decisions, and it must sync with the prospect’s existing buying and decision-making processes.

[18:10] Jeb tells of his experiences working with salespeople in various sectors, who worked either with, or without, using big data. Salespeople need to get out of their own way.

[21:03] Jeb gives a case study of a $4 Billion company with an average inside sale of $50K. Most reps relied highly on email, but the ultra high performers mainly called people.

[24:14] The ultra high performers who spent 80% of their time calling people had empowered themselves by managing their disruptive emotions. They overcame call reluctance. Salespeople are empowered to talk to people. They must do it.

[27:21] Jeb lays out some steps to becoming an ultra high performer. Begin with managing your disruptive emotions. Overcome your fear of engaging people. Jeb describes the factors of sales EQ and the sales process.

[31:11] Jeb talks about self-awareness. He recommends a peer review, and a coach. Ask for specific feedback from leaders. Sales EQ informs about cognitive biases, and ‘goal sheeting.’

[34:46] How do you encourage your thirst for learning? Jeb talks about four intelligences in sales. Acquired Intelligence depends only on you. There is always something to learn!

 

March 13, 2017

Push Your Limits to Achieve the Impossible. With Dan Waldschmidt. #404

Dan Waldschmidt, is a keynote speaker, business strategist, ultra runner, business owner and author of Edgy Conversations: How Ordinary People Can Achieve Outrageous Success.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[:53] Dan speaks to clients on ways to grow and dynamically scale ideas into massive money-makers. He also writes about concerns he faces and addresses in his own businesses.

[1:54] Dan pushes against what is “impossible,” by pushing limits — personally, with running; professionally, by strategizing to make “millions and billions” of dollars; and with clients, helping them to see the world differently, and to excel.

[2:30] Dan’s ultra-running goal for 2017 is to run another few thousand miles, in 100- and 50-mile races, and maybe a 200-mile race. Running gives him clarity for next steps. Transcendental Meditation and running keep him grounded.

[5:31] How did Dan cope when he wanted to quit, 20 miles into his last 100-mile race in the mountains of Alabama?

[8:14] Days after a race, Dan can reflect, “Dude, you didn’t even know that was possible, and you did it! What else don’t you know is possible, that is next on your list of things to do?”

[9:41] Instead of asking for salesmen to close better, ask why your business isn’t creating a brand or a customer experience so outrageously positive, that deals just automatically close?

[10:15] Dan couldn’t finish one race, because he had depleted his salt. Little things can have a fatal effect when you are trying to perform at a high level. The details matter when you answer the phone and how you brand.

[12:15] What are you prepared to sacrifice? Some people don’t progress because they have too many TV shows lined up to watch. Prioritize time. Your choices control your achievements. Be desperate to meet your goals.

[15:48] To perform at a high level, “burn the ships.” Make a list of five to ten things in your life that you need to burn right now, until you cross your continent and build new ships.

[17:54] To be amazing, you have to talk yourself down from your fears. You can learn not only to survive stressful situations, but to thrive, in spite of what happens around you.

[19:40] Successful people refuse to: excuse their mistakes; copy others (instead of building on their own strengths); or look down on others who are struggling (Dan tells of Jeff Bezos’s many years before Amazon turned a profit).

[27:09] Successful people refuse to: waste time doing things that don’t matter; or let the current chaos distract them from future success.

February 10, 2017

How to Be Resilient in Sales. With Bridget Gleason. #378

Welcome to another Front Line Friday with my very special guest and honorary co-host, Bridget Gleason. On this week’s episode, Bridget and I discuss resilience, why you need it in sales, tips that help you develop it; ideas to lift your sights, such as tracking small victories; and the suggestion to help others reach their own objectives.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[1:39] Have you had setbacks yet in 2017? Andy and Bridget discuss resilience. It is best developed through experience. The Japanese have a saying, “Fall seven times, get up eight.”

[3:05] Keep doing it. There is positive reinforcement from doing something hard. Make that next phone call, and the next, until you get some positive reinforcement.

[4:53] People who are resilient are not unemotional; they just find a way to put one foot in front of the other and keep at it, and they are persistent against that goal.

[5:52] Focus on small victories. Andy remembers teaching swimming lessons, where he learned the most important thing is to give people immediate success, and build on the success.

[6:46] Decide what the smallest unit of success for your daily tasks would be. Focus on that. A great phone conversation, or any goal you can set and meet. It starts a cycle of success.

[7:26] Bridget deliberately set achievable goals she would meet. Not easy, but ones she knew she could do. She wanted to reinforce, “I am a person who achieves the goals I set.”

[9:00] Andy’s boss used to ask him, “When’s the best time to go get an order? When you’ve just closed one!” Success encourages success. Teams will score twice in succession, in the rhythm.

[10:18] When you feel down, read something inspirational by anyone who inspires you. Bridget quoted from Devotion: Love and the Power of Small Steps, by Kim Nicol. Bridget looks until she finds what speaks to her. Keep words of wisdom in mind.

[14:41] Do something physical. Bridget accomplishes a run in the morning before she starts he workday. Take a walk in the middle of the day. It gives you energy. Get enough sleep.

[17:55] One way to lift yourself is to go help someone else, either someone who needs mentoring, or someone outside of work, where you can volunteer. You will get a boost.

[21:25] Being resilient means paying attention to yourself. If you are having a hard time, don’t ignore it; acknowledge it, and take corrective steps, as needed. Celebrate small wins. Go help someone else.

 

February 1, 2017

How to Make Your Own Game in Sales. And Win. With Chris Brogan. #370

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest Chris Brogan, CEO of Owner Media Group (which provides skills for the modern entrepreneur), a highly sought-after professional speaker, and the New York Times bestselling author of nine books and counting, his latest being, Find Your Writing Voice.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[1:54] Chris introduces his book coming out, called Make Your Own Game. The book has two sections. First is The Fast Book, for people who believe they are too busy to read. Second is The Real Book, for those who want it all.

[2:51] Make Your Own Game first teaches how to win a game, seeing it as story (who, what, and why you are playing), rules (how to play), and strategy (how to win). Second, it teaches how to create your own story, rules, and strategy.

[3:30] Some companies may say innovation is important, but then they retreat to, “That’s not the way we do it.” Innovation assumes risk, but proposes reward, and includes breaking out of the blue binder on the shelf.

[5:44] Chris tells how doing something extra on Facebook to connect, led to a third party’s offering him a business deal.

[6:33] There is a conflict in sales organizations between optimization of process and reporting through Big Data tools, and creating and nurturing human connections. Dashboards help, but people buy from people they know, like, and trust.

[10:31] It’s easy to see on social media what people’s interests are. Google your contact before your sales meeting. Find out what will help understand them better, and bond together.

[13:03] Your buyers are all involved in things outside the sale. There is great value in small talk. Chris would like to see it codified into systems. He admits to personally getting too familiar, too quickly, though.

[15:20] Teaching authenticity is like scripting improv.

[17:16] Andy suggests doing what you need, to be one percent better than the next guy. As the sales professional, you — not the price — are the first differentiation. Be your best you.

[18:44] Sales professionals need to spend more time learning about their clients and connecting to them. Uniquely human skills make the sale. Don’t show you are busy, show you are responsive to them.

[25:18] Sales is not about metric-driven methodologies. It’s about people. The biggest challenge in any sales organization is engaging with the prospect. It’s hard to put metrics on a sales rep’s ability to get others to ‘know, like, and trust’ them.

[29:47] Sales professionals, like most people, want to have a system. The sales challenge is to learn a really simple system to win the sale. Chris wants his book to help people with this, using self-permission.

January 18, 2017

Accelerate Your Success by Investing in Your Development. With Mike Weinberg. #358

Joining me for the third time on Accelerate! is my friend Mike Weinberg. He’s the author of two excellent books: New Sales. Simplified, and Sales Management. Simplified. Among the topics that Mike and I discuss are how salespeople can stop being commoditized and how you are responsible for your own development and success as a salesperson.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[2:08] The biggest challenge facing salespeople today, is being commoditized, instead of being seen as value producers.

[3:12] Why it’s essential salespeople must view themselves as consultants, professional problem-solvers and value creators.

[5:20] Being responsive — which is crucial — does not require you to provide a proposal prematurely. Mike explains why.

[8:06] Take ownership of your sales process. Tell the client you need to meet with them for discovery, so the proposal will be relevant to them.

[11:17] Salespersons used to be mentored in their roles. Now, they are sent out untrained, with a quota.

[12:53] The customer is learning and growing faster than the seller. The buyer doesn’t need the seller for info — they are drowning in it. Provide value by consulting to their needs.

[15:09] Mike’s message: Listen to Andy’s podcasts and link to the guest content; buy the books, especially, Amp Up Your Sales, by Andy Paul, and watch your sales! Invest in yourself!

[19:43] Andy’s lesson: regardless of any training your company provides or fails to provide, you have responsibility for your success, and there are resources available all around you.

[21:03] It’s the top people who invest in themselves, and take responsibility for their individual development. Andy pays a coach, and joined a Mastermind group.

[21:40] Your prospect really is in a less-than-optimal situation. You can help them. If your motivation is to help the customer win, you’re going to win. Prospect them, by all means, with all you’ve got, and get in front of them for discovery.

[25:38] Phone and email outreach methods are still valuable. Don’t give in to people who say they aren’t. Use every channel that touches your client positively.