Accelerate Podcast with Andy Paul
April 19, 2017

#436. How to Improve Sales Productivity Through Coaching. With Keith Rosen.

Keith Rosen, CEO, executive sales coach, transformational expert, advisor to top sales leaders, and author of the number one sales coaching book, Coaching Salespeople into Sales Champions: A Tactical Playbook for Managers and Executives, and his most recent book, Own Your Day: How Sales Leaders Master TIme Management, Minimize Distractions, and Create Their Ideal Lives, joins me on this episode of #Accelerate!

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[1:01] Keith has created his ideal life. He has coached sales leaders for the last 30 years around the globe in over 60 countries, for all aspects of the sales process.

[2:27] Keith started sales in college, door-to-door, selling mortgages, remodeling, and home security systems. Keith focused on making salespeople into great coaches, and started his business to address that objective.

[5:31] Keith compares trusted advisors to coaches. In selling, the same questions apply as in coaching.

[6:39] Keith discusses best practices in three areas: questions we ask; critical questions we fail to ask; and changing what we do and how we think. Then he offers a simple way to change our behaviors. One key desired behavior is to ask questions.

[11:43] If you have to close someone, you’re not doing your job.

[12:48] Coaching wasn’t always common. When Keith started coaching, people wanted to know the team. Keith says the coaching gap today is with sales managers.

[16:53] Keith insists that technology and data do not replace individual coaching. Coaching isn’t to gather data, but to help improve behaviors. Data doesn’t reveal why a seller excels. Why is observation necessary?

[23:54] Hiding behind technology makes it easier to avoid personal connections. LinkedIn is for connecting, and building relationships, not for spamming.

[26:01] Consumer retail isn’t dependent on relationships, but  complex B2B certainly is. In B2B, you want to like the person from whom you are buying.

[26:59] A to-do list is ineffective, and usually you put things off, because there is no accountability. Anything that cycles consistently, needs to go on a calendar, not a list. Only one-time items belong on a to-do list.

April 14, 2017

Build the Right Relationships with Your Buyers. With Bridget Gleason. #432

Bridget Gleason is VP of Sales for Logz.io and my regular guest on Front Line Fridays.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[1:43] The topic is relationships with buyers. The definition of relationship is key. Unless they buy online, and don’t interact with a person, there is a relationship, but is it a friendship?

[3:37] A relationship is a connection. There are fundamental parameters for a buyer-seller relationship that buyers want.

[6:24] The relationship is based on the seller’s performance in support of the buyer’s needs. Expectations of both parties must be met to maintain the relationship.

[9:39] Positive neutrality is the minimum relationship. A buyer who actively dislikes you will soon go to someone else. Should the buyer’s relationship be with the salesperson, or with the salesperson’s company?

[12:06] Doug Sandler’s Nice Guys Finish First, asserts that being nice is the key to attracting buyers. People buy from people — in particular, from people they enjoy.

[14:19] Gallup published a statement several years ago about a huge mismatch between buyers’ and sellers’ perceptions of the value of the relationship. Who values the emotional factor?

[14:55] Where do salespeople get the belief that they should be friends with the buyers? What do buyers want from the relationship? Techniques are easier to teach than likability.

[15:46] A bright person can learn the features of any product well enough to sell it, but can’t always learn to approach buyers on the right personal level. Interpersonal skills are not easy for everyone.

[17:14] Bridget does not hire “jerks.” In most instances, being nice carries you further.

[18:07] You need resilience in the relationship, if and when things go wrong during the purchase.

[19:41] Bridget recalls a sale with manufacturer production delays that were damaging to a buyer. Their past positive experiences helped them to see the purchase through.

[21:09] Difficult situations call for increased communications, not for hiding from the customer. Overcommunicate. Do not let the relationship fall apart from neglect.

March 23, 2017

Using Data to Drive Effective Coaching. With Duncan Lennox. #413

Joining me once again on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest Duncan Lennox, CEO of Qstream.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[:37] Duncan is Co-Founder and CEO of Qstream, an enterprise SaaS company. Qstream helps companies drive capabilities of their sales force. Accelerate Episode 106 explains more on Qstream.

[1:29] On average, how much time does a sales manager spend, coaching each rep?

[4:28] Managers would benefit from data on the most effective coaching they can give. Why don’t managers coach better?

[7:36] Inertia keeps organizations back. Two curves are crossing: the pain of the problem, and the ability to leverage data. There is a need to act, and data capture is one way.

[12:19] Sales managers don’t have the data to know how to increases sales, and help reps succeed.

[14:18] Qstream started with the goal of changing behaviors for good. From data they gathered, they saw a second use: data-driven coaching. This became The Coaching Hub.

[16:45] The data is gathered from 3-minute tests the reps take. Scenarios are given, and the reps reply how they would act. What sorts of data do the results generate?

[19:19] An average of 94% reps participate the day they receive a scenario. What else can participation reveal about a rep?

[21:10] How does the dashboard inform the sales manager on the individual needs of the sales reps?

[22:03] How did Qstream rule out the sales problem one company had assumed? How did they uncover the actual problem?

[26:43] How does The Coaching Hub integrate with Salesforce? What kinds of triggers are available?

[29:34] Duncan gives an example of Qstream and Salesforce integration to prompt an appropriate coaching response.

 

March 19, 2017

How to Be an Ultra High Performer. With Jeb Blount. #Special

Jeb Blount is the CEO of Sales Gravy, a keynote speaker, sales acceleration strategist, and author of a great new book, Sales EQ: How Ultra High Performers Leverage Sales-Specific Emotional Intelligence to Close the Complex Deal.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[:48] In addition to being CEO of Sales Gravy, Jeb has written eight books. In 2016, he spent 270 days traveling to speak. He trains and coaches salespeople to accelerate their results.

[2:05] Jeb explains how he wrote a book while traveling. He uses time blocking. He flies first class, to make the airplane his office. He passionately enjoys what he does.
[4:57] Sales EQ comes from Jeb’s 20-year search for what makes the top 1% into ultra high performers. He found they work only on high-probability sales, and they have a great EQ.

[8:51] How do both introverts and extroverts excel at sales? Jeb explains how each can use ‘dual process’ to stand in the stakeholders’ shoes, while keeping in mind their own outcome for the deal. Ultra high performers use dual process.

[12:03] Jeb discusses the psychology of the sales process. A sales process is a linear system designed around the way a buyer’s irrational brain makes decisions, and it must sync with the prospect’s existing buying and decision-making processes.

[18:10] Jeb tells of his experiences working with salespeople in various sectors, who worked either with, or without, using big data. Salespeople need to get out of their own way.

[21:03] Jeb gives a case study of a $4 Billion company with an average inside sale of $50K. Most reps relied highly on email, but the ultra high performers mainly called people.

[24:14] The ultra high performers who spent 80% of their time calling people had empowered themselves by managing their disruptive emotions. They overcame call reluctance. Salespeople are empowered to talk to people. They must do it.

[27:21] Jeb lays out some steps to becoming an ultra high performer. Begin with managing your disruptive emotions. Overcome your fear of engaging people. Jeb describes the factors of sales EQ and the sales process.

[31:11] Jeb talks about self-awareness. He recommends a peer review, and a coach. Ask for specific feedback from leaders. Sales EQ informs about cognitive biases, and ‘goal sheeting.’

[34:46] How do you encourage your thirst for learning? Jeb talks about four intelligences in sales. Acquired Intelligence depends only on you. There is always something to learn!

 

February 11, 2017

How To Hire and Coach the Best Sales Professionals. With Ken Thoreson. #379

Joining me once again on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest Ken Thoreson, President of Acumen Management Group, and author of several books on sales, sales management, hiring, and personal development. Ken’s latest book is, SLAMMED!!! For the First Time Sales Manager.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[1:01] Acumen Management was started 19 years ago, focused on strengthening sales management, through workshops, blogs, and books, around leading an organization, sales compensation planning, and hiring a high-performance team.

[2:16] Sales managers are often promoted from sales, with no management training. They have a list of management responsibilities, but continue to stick to sales activities, don’t set priorities, and fail to create business and sales plans.

[4:20] The biggest challenge facing sales managers today is their inability to build a process, so they can focus on the execution. Most organizations have poor sales execution.

[5:45] Ken quotes Butch Jones, Football Coach, U of Tennessee, “Every player does not give 110% every day; it’s the coach’s job to increase their intensity and the effort they give.” Coach to align the soul of the individual with the goal of the company.

[6:44] Salespeople need to believe in the company, in the product or service, and in how they can impact their clients. The sales manager needs stories, with real examples of people being helped. Salespeople leave if they don’t believe.

[11:09] “Don’t swing at the first pitch.” If you mis-hire, it costs four times what you paid in salary.

[16:09] Build the right candidate profile, and involve other managers, people in the sales team, and maybe customers, in the choice.

[19:21] Look at your product or service, the client you need to influence, who you want to have approaching them, and what kind of training they will need. You may hire a non-salesperson with product expertise.

[21:50] Assessments are a tool, and they should be more of an indicator, than a screen. Testing is essential. An interview is no place for trust. Let the candidate give a presentation, write a pitch on your product, or be tested in a social situation.

[26:36] Hire slow; fire fast. Take everyone through the hiring process. Do not skip a step. Just like the sales process, it’s there to qualify the candidate.

[27:58] Ken gives sample interview questions, and the reasons for them.

[30:34] Ken recommends clients start a book club, and discuss the book for 15 minutes in every weekly sales meeting. Andy mentions his 15-minute daily reading program for clients.

February 10, 2017

How to Be Resilient in Sales. With Bridget Gleason. #378

Welcome to another Front Line Friday with my very special guest and honorary co-host, Bridget Gleason. On this week’s episode, Bridget and I discuss resilience, why you need it in sales, tips that help you develop it; ideas to lift your sights, such as tracking small victories; and the suggestion to help others reach their own objectives.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[1:39] Have you had setbacks yet in 2017? Andy and Bridget discuss resilience. It is best developed through experience. The Japanese have a saying, “Fall seven times, get up eight.”

[3:05] Keep doing it. There is positive reinforcement from doing something hard. Make that next phone call, and the next, until you get some positive reinforcement.

[4:53] People who are resilient are not unemotional; they just find a way to put one foot in front of the other and keep at it, and they are persistent against that goal.

[5:52] Focus on small victories. Andy remembers teaching swimming lessons, where he learned the most important thing is to give people immediate success, and build on the success.

[6:46] Decide what the smallest unit of success for your daily tasks would be. Focus on that. A great phone conversation, or any goal you can set and meet. It starts a cycle of success.

[7:26] Bridget deliberately set achievable goals she would meet. Not easy, but ones she knew she could do. She wanted to reinforce, “I am a person who achieves the goals I set.”

[9:00] Andy’s boss used to ask him, “When’s the best time to go get an order? When you’ve just closed one!” Success encourages success. Teams will score twice in succession, in the rhythm.

[10:18] When you feel down, read something inspirational by anyone who inspires you. Bridget quoted from Devotion: Love and the Power of Small Steps, by Kim Nicol. Bridget looks until she finds what speaks to her. Keep words of wisdom in mind.

[14:41] Do something physical. Bridget accomplishes a run in the morning before she starts he workday. Take a walk in the middle of the day. It gives you energy. Get enough sleep.

[17:55] One way to lift yourself is to go help someone else, either someone who needs mentoring, or someone outside of work, where you can volunteer. You will get a boost.

[21:25] Being resilient means paying attention to yourself. If you are having a hard time, don’t ignore it; acknowledge it, and take corrective steps, as needed. Celebrate small wins. Go help someone else.

 

January 28, 2017

How to Apply the Coaching Model in Your Organization. With Barry Demp. #367

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest Barry Demp, Founder of Barry Demp Coaching, and author of an interesting book, called, The Quotable Coach: Daily Nuggets of Practical Wisdom. Among the many topics that Barry and I discuss are how a coaching relationship differs from a management relationship, why it’s essential to connect with the vision and values of your people, and how to find fulfillment in your work.  

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[:50] Barry taught Science for two years in the Philadelphia Public Schools. He moved into pharmaceuticals in sales and marketing for 12-1/2 years, for Upjohn. Barry left in 1992.

[2:48] Barry was moved by the Barcelona Olympic Games. A documentary on athletes and coaches inspired him to bring coaching to business, which he has been doing for 24 years.

[7:09] In a coaching relationship, people promise action to fulfill a future goal they intend to achieve. They lead themselves to the future they desire. Old-school management is, my job is to get you to go where I need you, like it, or not.

[9:33] When people’s vision and values connect with the organization, they see work can be an expression of themselves, and they engage with it, and are fulfilled by that community, and they build it up to mutual benefit.

[13:16] The balance begins with relationships. Quality relationships underlie quality results. Knowing your employees, and their values, are drivers of human behavior. “We’re not a machine anymore,” ― Seth Godin.

[23:48] Barry’s book is developed from his blog. Andy notes selected quotes: “You’re more likely to act yourself into
feeling, than feel yourself into action.” ― Jerome Bruner.
Start something!

[25:47] “People are anxious to improve their circumstances, but they’re unwilling to improve themselves. They therefore remain bound.” ― James Allen. Invest in yourself!

[27:10] “Don’t stumble over something behind you”
― Seneca the Younger. Where do we live — past, present, or future? Be present in the moment, and step into the future!

[28:34] “Death is Nature’s advice to get plenty of life.”
― Goethe. Life is finite. Get the most out of it!

[30:06] “Our chief want in life is somebody who will make us do what we can.” ― Ralph Waldo Emerson. The ability to take a stand for other people is a remarkably powerful place!

[31:30] “If you chase two rabbits, both will escape.”
― Author Unknown. Choose and focus! The most productive people are highly-focused, not multi-taskers.

[32:33] “Instead of seeking new landscapes, develop new eyes.” ― Marcel Proust. Perception is reality. If we perceive things in new ways, we create new realities!

November 17, 2016

Use Transparency to Transform the Buying Experience. With Gerald Vanderpuye. #308

My guest on this episode of Accelerate! is Gerald Vanderpuye, Co-founder and CEO of BuyerDeck, a sales enablement and collaboration platform. Gerald and I discuss, among other topics, Gerald’s inadvertent sales error with a prospect that led to a record-breaking order, what Gerald learned from that mistake that led to the creation BuyerDeck, and how to provide the transparency and responsiveness that transforms the customer buying experience and produces more sales.

November 8, 2016

How to Grow by Going for NO to Get to YES. With Andrea Waltz. #300

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is Andrea Waltz, Founder of Courage Crafters, keynote speaker, and co-author of the book, Go for NO! YES Is the Destination, NO Is How You Get There. In this episode, Andrea and I discuss the real meaning of the word ‘no’, the cultural bases for the fear of failure, and how to rapidly grow your sales by getting to ‘yes’ after a long day of ‘no’.

October 31, 2016

How to Rebuild Your Confidence. With Molly Fletcher. #293

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is Molly Fletcher, CEO of the Molly Fletcher company, motivational speaker, entrepreneur, coach and author of 3 books: A Winner’s Guide to Negotiating: How Conversation Gets Deals Done, The Business of Being the Best, and The 5 Best Tools to Find Your Dream Career. Prior to starting her company, Molly was President of client representation for the sports and entertainment agency, CSE, where she spent 2 decades as one of the world’s only female sports agents, and has been nicknamed the “female Jerry Maguire” by CNN. Among the many topics Molly and I discuss in this episode how to rebuild your confidence after a set back, the important differences and similarities between selling and negotiating, and how to create and utilize a personal mission statement to help you achieve your goals.