Accelerate Podcast with Andy Paul
April 8, 2017

#427. Put Purpose to Work in Your Business. With Scott Beebe.

Scott Beebe, Founder and Head Coach of MyBusinessOnPurpose.com, joins me on this episode of #Accelerate!

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[1:32] Scott gives the rundown on his background in football, theology, corporate, church, and an NGO. After his position was dissolved, he hired a business coach, to start his business to liberate small business owners from the chaos of business.

[4:55] Entrepreneurs today find themselves busy playing every role on the team. Instead of planning how to grow, they haven’t even determined where they want to be in three years.

[7:27] Scott cites Michael Gerber’s E-Myth. You need to provide immediate service, while running a company, and always have a vision story for growth.

[10:24] Six months to six years is a good timeframe for a vision story. How does that differ from a goal? Vision requires time for finances, products, and personnel to mature.

[13:05] The vision story is the detailed snapshot picture of what the future looks like. How does it relate to your mission statement?

[14:21] Your vision story, and your unique core values drive your day-to-day decision making.

[14:44] Unique core values are personal to you, beyond the basic core values such as integrity. Scott gives case examples of how core values inform projects.

[16:43] Scott gives an example how one unique core value works ideally for one concrete contractor, but would not work for someone else.

[18:20] Core values also inform prospect and seller whether they are a good match for each other.

[21:14] Core values win deals. Scott gives another example.

[22:43] “[Unique core values] are the curbs along the side of the road you’re taking to get to your vision.” — Scott Beebe

[24:03] Scott explains by an example what kind of case would justify violating your unique core value.

March 15, 2017

Hurdle the Barriers to Your Sales Success. With Ralph Barsi. #406

Ralph Barsi, Senior Director, Global Demand Center for ServiceNow.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[:53] Ralph oversees the worldwide sales development at ServiceNow. His teams work to feed the top of the funnel.

[3:20] Ralph explains how he engages gatekeepers.

[4:57] ServiceNow started in San Diego, streamlining IT service workflow. They have expanded their offering, worldwide, to all business units within the enterprise.

[7:41] Gartner claims that in 2015, 70% of IT decisions were made outside of IT. How does this influence the sales process?

[8:40] What are the five major barriers to a sale?

[9:17] Ralph discusses how to help reps overcome obscurity. How do you maintain your LinkedIn profile? Ralph credits Jamie Shanks and his company for branding help.

[13:44] Ralph suggests looking at your market carefully, and setting up profiles with pertinent stories and metrics.

[16:04] Technology enables connection, but it distracts in the moment. What behavioral example should leaders set for smartphone use?

[21:00] What does Ralph ask his organization to do each week on LinkedIn, and social media? How can the smartphone help, and how can it hinder?

[22:14] What did Ralph learn about action, from Tony Robbins’ RPM model? How do Ralph’s team leaders incentivize behaviors and outcomes? What flexibilities do they have?

[29:34] Ralph talks about Steve Richards and Call Camp. How is conversation flow a problem with reps? What about scripts and being present in conversation? How does small talk apply?

[35:55] When is the right time to sharpen your craft, and better your game? What do you choose to do with leisure time? Take charge of your career path.

March 8, 2017

Use A Talent Strategy to Hire ‘A’ Players. With Mike Drapeau. #400


Mike Drapeau, is Managing Partner at Sales Benchmark Index. He heads SBI’s internal talent development.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[3:58] Revenue Growth Methodology is built around three pillars of growth: marketing, sales, and product. The equation is 50% talent and 50% performance conditions. What talent strategy can help underperforming companies?

[6:02] Mike cites Elliott Jaques on talent potentiality, and Reid Hoffman of LinkedIn on the alliance between employer and employee. SBI looks not just for accomplishments, but also for  potentiality. They measure Sacrifice Tolerance Level.

[7:27] STL is measured specifically to each position, by asking what they were willing to sacrifice, and if they knew for what purpose they were sacrificing. Mike cites Clayton Christensen. Will what they give up now get them to where they want to be?

[8:14] Mike looks for people who can do long-term and short-term thinking. Instead of a learning curve, SBI offers a learning cliff, and it’s not an easy climb. The job trial is role specific, but three weeks, 10 hours a week, of their A-game.

[11:20] Mike explains the type of job trial they might offer to a candidate; in this example, a role-played virtual video presentation suited to the client scenario. Empathy is a core differentiator for working with clients, and they test for it.

[14:44] Andy says companies write job specifications, but they don’t test to the specifications. Mike agrees it is necessary to create conditions that will test the candidate’s performance and suitability for a role.

[16:40] Greg Alexander, SBI CEO, co-wrote Topgrading for Sales on how to hire the best salespeople. Calculate the cost of hiring a C player instead of an A player.

[18:27] References should include the last three bosses, and a subordinate. Look at W2s for three years. Test candidates to analyze data. Use the “threat of reference check.” One killer question for past bosses: “How would you manage them?”

[23:09] Onboarding best practices are addressed in articles Mike has written at SalesBenchmarkIndex.com, available for free. SBI uses a self-service tool called Asana. Put someone very senior over onboarding (sales manager or higher).

[24:24] Onboarding is a four-month process, integrating content specific to a role, by stage of development, by month. A personal dossier merges personal goals with professional aspirations. A tour of duty plans out a three-year path.

[28:45] Sales training is preparation for coaching. Without the coaching, the training degrades quickly. SBI teaches sales managers how to coach, not how to manage. Coaching is 20-25% of a manager’s time and effort.

March 7, 2017

Cut “No-Decisions” in Half with Great Software Demonstrations. With Peter Cohan. #399

Peter Cohan is Founder of The Second Derivative, author of Great Demo! How To Create And Execute Stunning Software Demonstrations, and expert in giving online software presentations and software demonstrations.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[3:22] Peter wanted to structure demos to be compelling, convincing, and intriguing. He invented a methodology to do that.

[5:38] The online demo is a critical milestone on the buying journey. It’s the moment when things start to go wrong. Peter shares a story how this can happen.

[8:51] Some use demos as discovery to find out things they should have learned already. Peter says it’s best to do discovery fully before a technical proof demo. The next-best case is a 3-minute vision generation demo before discovery.

[11:03] The overview is one demonstration Peter recommends never to do. These go by various names: ‘show up and throw up,’ ‘spray and pray,’ and ‘the harbor tour.’ Your prospect will jump ship!

[13:00] Focus on what (customer’s pain), and how (specific capabilities relevant to solving the pain). Specific capabilities include only what fixes the pain point. Next, comes the value of change, and critical dates. It’s all about customer situations.

[15:52] Andy views the demo as a story, beginning to end. Peter suggests using customer success stories to introduce a vision generation demo. Journalism’s inverted pyramid is a good demo model: Headline, graphic, summary, explanation.

[21:50] Don’t use a standard non personalized demo. Summarize often, and ask: “Is my understanding correct?” “Is there any new information?” “Is this the kind of thing you had in mind?” “Would you like to see what it takes in software?”

[23:45] When you summarize frequently, you give the audience cues to comment, ask questions, and participate. You reinforce your message, and allow the audience to reflect back what they hear. Ask them to give feedback as they listen.

[30:44] To demonstrate a complex matter like a CRM, break it into chunks, introducing each one, developing it, and summarizing it, with questions. You might have a separate 10-minute demo for each function.

[31:58] Before going to a demo, understand the situation slide fully, and be able to discuss it in depth. Role play a discussion beforehand. Know what you will say, and what you will not say. Prepare. You can cut no-decisions by half, with good info.

[34:44] You want a relationship. After vision generation, follow up with a call: “Are you comfortable with setting a time for a real discovery call?” After the discovery, call to ask: “Are you ready for a demo?” Then ask: “What else is needed?”

 

March 1, 2017

Using Social Teaming to Build Your Referral Team. With Dean DeLisle. #394

Dean DeLisle, is the Founder and CEO of Forward Progress, Inc.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[1:02] Dean started Forward Progress 13 years ago. When digital and social media came out, Dean wanted to educate salespeople on how to use it effectively.

[2:41] The biggest myth around social selling is that it is as simple as putting up a LinkedIn profile. Opening a door does not automatically invite and attract customers.

[4:32] A study shows that 75% of execs who buy use social media. Connect with enough people to engage with active buyers you can serve.

[5:51] Buyers today do not phone their friends for purchase recommendations; they go to social media connections, and ask them for product recommendations. People trust their network.

[7:18] IDC says buyers are coming into the sales cycle later in the buying process, after their own research. The buyer’s credibility is on the line with each purchase. Connections in common with the vendor or salesperson provide validation.

[11:12] Social teaming is derived from sports team practices, and their recruitment vetting profiles. Dean coaches entrepreneurs to determine, and team up with, the top five people they know well, that would give reciprocal referrals.

[15:40] Dean found 92% of people are actually spending most of their time with people in their network who are not good candidates for their top five team of referral producers.

[17:16] When their top five people aren’t performing, they need 10 more to back them up. Those are the bench. The next 25 on the list are the practice squad. This team of 40 represents the authentic relationships people can manage. Connects to two of the 40 per day, socially, acknowledging mutual business interests.

[19:02] The relationships are scored 0 to 5. A “5,” is a close connection that will regularly provide referrals, sometimes without being asked. You can also look at their social connections and ask for referrals you need.
[20:22] How do I identify my top five? Look at the people you know who already help you. Find the most helpful one, and look for four more like them.

[24:57] To scout for new team members, at a networking event, consciously connect with people you haven’t met, and evaluate them against your top five. You may discover “the next starter.” Daily pick two of your 40 to consider to advance.

[30:43] Not everyone on LinkedIn is your team. Focus on relationships with people you can help, and who can help you. Dean’s team is developing a mobile app with an AI relationship engine to make recommendations. Until then, it’s all manual.

February 18, 2017

How to Align Sales and Marketing for Best Results. With Peter Buscemi. #385

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest Peter Buscemi, Founder of Four Quadrant, LLC. He serves as an advisor and educator to Fortune 1000 companies and startups, and provides go-to-market resources. Among the topics that Peter and I discuss are the connections between sales and marketing roles, and a one-page Sales & Marketing Quick Reference Card that should sit by every telephone in your organization.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[5:32] Where is the dividing line between Sales and Marketing? Where do the SDRs fit? Peter quotes David Packard, “Marketing is much too important to leave to marketers.”

[6:24] Peter says Marketing either builds or maintains a brand, or helps build better products, or helps sell.

[6:58] Demand creation and field marketing functions are best handled by marketing. A salesperson is too expensive to use for development. Carve out tasks for the experts in that area.

[8:48] “Integrated Sales and Marketing” does not want Marketing Qualified Leads. It wants Sales Qualified Leads. The salesperson wants opportunities with high propensity to close.

[10:25] How do you align Sales and Marketing?

[14:16] Why companies need to plan with a longer planning horizon. It takes months between planning for opportunities, engaging them, and closing them.

[18:55] Peter offers a Sales & Marketing Quick Reference Card, to put Sales and Marketing on one page, for a SDR or a BDR to have in front of them on phone calls. It has a positioning statement, opportunity use cases, discovery questions, FAQs.

[28:03] Building a brand and maintaining it are necessary, but those are not sales messages. Sales needs to align with corporate messaging, but focus on client needs. Marketing needs to know sales messaging, to create leads.

 

February 15, 2017

How to Use An Emissary to Help You Win the Enterprise Sale. With David Hammer. #382

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest David Hammer, Founder and CEO of Emissary.io. Among the topics that David and I discuss are how to tap the knowledge of experts to help you win the complex sale, how Emissary.io matches emissaries to sales organizations seeking enterprise insights, and today’s state of the art of complex sales methodology.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[1:12] Emissary is a platform to unlock people’s knowledge for sales.

[3:25] Emissary taps knowledge employees as emissaries and then matches them to sales organizations who can utilize the information to build relationships with stakeholders and win deals. Every emissary has direct knowledge of decision-makers.

[7:18] The Emissary program starts with a client that has an enterprise opportunity. Emissary.io matches emmissaries to the client’s opportunity.

[7:37] Individual emissaries provide intelligence and support throughout the course of the deal. They do not replace the sales professional.

[11:33] Emissaries are recruited and screened for their currency of knowledge.

[12:50] Andy recalls a multi-million deal where he could have used an emissary. The prospect was using them as a stalking-horse, to get a better price from the current vendor.

[15:25] Richard Ruff was the guest on Accelerate, Episode 114. David requotes Richard: “The key thing about account-based selling, is that it is resistant to traditional standardization. Every account is its own strategy; its own approach.”

[16:53] Sales automation and mechanization can hinder the art of selling. Andy sees a trend in 2017 of a return to a focus on the human element in selling. The science supports the art, but without the human art, the science is weak.

[26:14] David says emissaries provide valuable context for complex deals that sales can’t obtain on its own.

 

February 13, 2017

How to Use Dignity and Humor to Engage with Prospects. With Dianna Geairn. #380

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest Dianna Geairn, The Irreverent Salesgirl. Among the many topics that Dianna and I discuss are Dianna’s intention to restore dignity to the profession of sales, how and why she uses a musical stage production with animation to teach sales principles, some sales myths Dianna debunks, and, how a company becomes sales ready.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[2:14] The Irreverent Salesgirl aims to turn sales myths on their heads, with humor. The organization’s tagline is bringing a dash of dignity to the art of selling. Their mission is to drive public perception of sales as a profession.

[4:06] Dianna writes, blogs, and does a stage show about sales. She says, she sells by day, and fights “sales crimes” by night.

[5:48] Dianna was transfixed by Eddie Murphy’s show “Raw,” and wanted to bring something similar to sales. People absorb new concepts much better through entertainment than other ways.

[7:39] Diana discusses two Sales Myths: Sales Myth 1: Never accept a “No.” Sales Myth 2: Salespeople must overcome objections.

[14:27] Dianna discusses her upcoming book, Sales Readiness and what it means for companies to be “sales ready.”

[18:44] Why Dianna suggests listening to what people are asking you to provide in order to learn what people are ready to buy.

[21:59] Why an entrepreneur must be able to sell their product before you hiring someone to sell it for them.

[27:20] What is the aha moment in sales?

[36:54] Why you need to allow your sales professionals to go off script, take risks, make mistakes, and unleash their natural genius.

February 12, 2017

Repeat: How You Can Stay Focused and Productive When You’re Crazy Busy. With Jill Konrath. #351

Welcome to Sales Kick-Off Week on Accelerate!

Joining me on Day Two of The Accelerate! Virtual Sales Kick-off Week is my guest Jill Konrath.

Jill Konrath is a speaker, sales expert, and author of multiple best-selling books, including her most recent offering: More Sales, Less Time: Surprisingly Simple Strategies For Today’s Crazy-Busy Sellers.

On Day Two of our 2017 Virtual Sales Kick-off Meeting, we’re going to focus on your personal productivity.

In this episode, Jill shares some essential tips and techniques to help you, the sales professional, jump-start your productivity in 2017. She provides time-saving and time-creating strategies that you can immediately put to use to stay focused and become more productive amidst the chaos of your daily sales life.

Want more selling time in 2017? Then listen to this episode now!

(Note: in this podcast, Andy refers to the previous episode with Jill Konrath as Episode 319, released on December 1. A scheduling change was necessary after the recording. The previous episode with Jill Konrath is Episode 331, released on December 15, 2016.)

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[1:16] Jill says the single biggest challenge facing sales reps in 2017 is ‘overwhelm.’ Sales reps are constantly running behind, in a time-draining digital swamp.

[3:16] Newly-added technologies take time to learn and may not connect with each other. The more time you spend online, the more overwhelmed you feel.

[5:44] Learn to segregate sales activities and online activities into different time blocks, and not to mix them.

[5:59] Research shows that constantly jumping in and out of email lowers female IQ by five points, and male IQ by fifteen points. Being addicted to email literally saps your intelligence.

[7:01] Jill researched physical and social sciences for her book More Sales, Less Time. One study showed the top 10% producers worked for an average of 52 minutes, then went off on a non-electronic physical break before returning to work.

[10:28] Trigger events, either within an organization, or external to it, suddenly change the organization’s priorities. Jill gives examples of internal and external triggers that change organizational goals and lead to sales opportunities.

[11:41] A sales professional who tracks specific triggers, can start a conversation before their competitors know about it.

[12:55] Be the prospect’s first contact, with your viable vision when it is needed, and you have a 74% chance of winning the business. People buy what is ‘good enough.’

[14:29] Plan a campaign at the start, including pre-written appropriate email messages, to roll out over the next month. Don’t rethink each contact step. Leverage your activities.

[18:15] Examine where the prospect is. Be rigorous with yourself. Do not delude yourself into thinking you have more opportunities than truly are there. Unclog the pipeline.

[20:59] Each morning, take a few minutes to ‘go quiet.’ Focus, settle into where you want to spend your time.

[22:57] Go quiet before a prospect meeting. Cut distractions, to be more present in the meeting. They’ll feel the difference in you, leading to a different conversation, and a higher level of trust.

February 8, 2017

How to Use Sales Intelligence to Engage with Prospects. With Sam Richter. #376

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest Sam Richter, Founder and CEO of SBR Worldwide/Know More, and author of the bestseller called, Take the Cold Out of Cold Calling

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[3:37] A new salesperson starts in survival mode, and struggles to convince people to do something. It took a mentor to show Sam the nobleness of the sales profession — helping people.

[6:22] Sam’s core expertise is in sales intelligence — finding information on other people, to help your approach be relevant to what they care about.

[6:42] Your prospects are amazingly passionate about one thing. What is it? It’s themselves. What they care about is their problem, and their motivation might not be what you think.

[9:02] To determine if you are a salesperson, or a sales professional, ask yourself if you have ever recommended your competitor, or somebody else, to one of your prospects, when they were a better fit. If you did, it comes back in referrals.

[12:40] Sales professionals are underutilizing social media for sales intelligence. Sharing content is great, but also search out what the prospect cares about, so when you pick up the phone, you first address that matter, for a quick connection.

[16:12] Sam teaches the 3×5 method. Spend three minutes trying to find five pieces of information about a prospect. [17:07] Twitter has advanced searches you can save to find trigger events, such as new product launches, that give you ‘permission’ to call your contact.

[22:04] YouGottheNews.com is a filtered search engine, similar to Google’s News tab, that searches large and small news publications. YouGotSocial.com is a filtered search to mine Facbook for information about your prospects.

[31:03] Nothing sent through the Internet disappears — not even deleted email messages. Everything on your timeline is available, including friends, and what they put on their pages.