Accelerate Podcast with Andy Paul
February 18, 2017

How to Align Sales and Marketing for Best Results. With Peter Buscemi. #385

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest Peter Buscemi, Founder of Four Quadrant, LLC. He serves as an advisor and educator to Fortune 1000 companies and startups, and provides go-to-market resources. Among the topics that Peter and I discuss are the connections between sales and marketing roles, and a one-page Sales & Marketing Quick Reference Card that should sit by every telephone in your organization.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[5:32] Where is the dividing line between Sales and Marketing? Where do the SDRs fit? Peter quotes David Packard, “Marketing is much too important to leave to marketers.”

[6:24] Peter says Marketing either builds or maintains a brand, or helps build better products, or helps sell.

[6:58] Demand creation and field marketing functions are best handled by marketing. A salesperson is too expensive to use for development. Carve out tasks for the experts in that area.

[8:48] “Integrated Sales and Marketing” does not want Marketing Qualified Leads. It wants Sales Qualified Leads. The salesperson wants opportunities with high propensity to close.

[10:25] How do you align Sales and Marketing?

[14:16] Why companies need to plan with a longer planning horizon. It takes months between planning for opportunities, engaging them, and closing them.

[18:55] Peter offers a Sales & Marketing Quick Reference Card, to put Sales and Marketing on one page, for a SDR or a BDR to have in front of them on phone calls. It has a positioning statement, opportunity use cases, discovery questions, FAQs.

[28:03] Building a brand and maintaining it are necessary, but those are not sales messages. Sales needs to align with corporate messaging, but focus on client needs. Marketing needs to know sales messaging, to create leads.

 

February 10, 2017

How to Be Resilient in Sales. With Bridget Gleason. #378

Welcome to another Front Line Friday with my very special guest and honorary co-host, Bridget Gleason. On this week’s episode, Bridget and I discuss resilience, why you need it in sales, tips that help you develop it; ideas to lift your sights, such as tracking small victories; and the suggestion to help others reach their own objectives.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[1:39] Have you had setbacks yet in 2017? Andy and Bridget discuss resilience. It is best developed through experience. The Japanese have a saying, “Fall seven times, get up eight.”

[3:05] Keep doing it. There is positive reinforcement from doing something hard. Make that next phone call, and the next, until you get some positive reinforcement.

[4:53] People who are resilient are not unemotional; they just find a way to put one foot in front of the other and keep at it, and they are persistent against that goal.

[5:52] Focus on small victories. Andy remembers teaching swimming lessons, where he learned the most important thing is to give people immediate success, and build on the success.

[6:46] Decide what the smallest unit of success for your daily tasks would be. Focus on that. A great phone conversation, or any goal you can set and meet. It starts a cycle of success.

[7:26] Bridget deliberately set achievable goals she would meet. Not easy, but ones she knew she could do. She wanted to reinforce, “I am a person who achieves the goals I set.”

[9:00] Andy’s boss used to ask him, “When’s the best time to go get an order? When you’ve just closed one!” Success encourages success. Teams will score twice in succession, in the rhythm.

[10:18] When you feel down, read something inspirational by anyone who inspires you. Bridget quoted from Devotion: Love and the Power of Small Steps, by Kim Nicol. Bridget looks until she finds what speaks to her. Keep words of wisdom in mind.

[14:41] Do something physical. Bridget accomplishes a run in the morning before she starts he workday. Take a walk in the middle of the day. It gives you energy. Get enough sleep.

[17:55] One way to lift yourself is to go help someone else, either someone who needs mentoring, or someone outside of work, where you can volunteer. You will get a boost.

[21:25] Being resilient means paying attention to yourself. If you are having a hard time, don’t ignore it; acknowledge it, and take corrective steps, as needed. Celebrate small wins. Go help someone else.

 

February 5, 2017

Repeat: How to Sell More in Less Time. With Jill Konrath. #331

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is my friend Jill Konrath. Jill is a speaker, sales expert, and author of multiple bestselling books, including Selling to Big Companies, Snap Selling, Agile Selling, and her latest book, More Sales, Less Time. Among the many topics that Jill and I discuss are how she came to focus on selling more in less time, what she learned from her research about concentration, focus and how to eliminate distraction that waste selling time, how to make the most of the limited hours available each, and how you can take the More Sales, Less Time Challenge.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[2:19] After Jill wrote SNAP Selling, about selling to frazzled customers, readers asked her how to simplify their own lives. She had no idea how to help them, so she researched it.

[6:37] Research shows multitasking is an illusion. Learn what happens when you try to jump between two tasks and refocus your attention.

[8:20] How often the average sales person checks their cell phone each day. And how each interruption reduces productivity.

[8:40] To write More Sales, Less Time, Jill used herself as a test subject for the before and after metrics for each new strategy she tried.

[10:44] Jill shares how using your willpower impacts your ability to make decisions.

[14:20] Jill’s Time Master Manifesto sets rules to manage time, starting with getting seven-and-a-half hours of sleep nightly.

[17:28] How you should start each business day before turning on your computer and checking your email.

[20:12] Two books to assist salespeople in learning how to prioritize are Essentialism, and The One Thing.

[24:03] Challenge the status quo at all times, looking for a better way to achieve the end result.

[25:00] Jill shares the value of scheduling your activities into blocks of time. You are most productive while focusing on one activity.

February 4, 2017

How to Tell Stories, Teach Lessons, and Sell Products. With Jeremy Reeves. #373

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest Jeremy Reeves, the CEO of Kaizen Marketing, and host of the marketing podcast, Sales Funnel Mastery.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[2:09] Jeremy sells by words, as a sales copywriter, through websites and emails, anticipating and overcoming objections without talking. He has helped clients generate roughly $50M.

[5:33] How does sales automation affect sales? Buyers buy some items for thousands of dollars, without personal contact, but does it maximize the sale?

[8:11] Jeremy recalls a client’s experience with a two-step online lead generation campaign. They had a salesperson call prospects who stopped at the first step. With a call, the client increased their qualified leads by 50% over their online results.

[11:00] Is the sales funnel, either online, or face-to-face, becoming obsolete? Jeremy suggests adding more relevancy by segmenting it into specific audiences — multiple funnels.

[15:15] Is Sales losing its value to buyers in an era of near perfect information?

[17:56] Recently, Jeremy has seen an emphasis on building relationships, or engagement. People respond to relatable, emotional vulnerability, in your stories that teach lessons.

[22:02] Jeremy puts personal relatable events into his emails, to create engagement. His copywriting is about getting people to know, like, and trust you and your product.

[25:05] In the current wave of disruption in sales, automation is not creating the necessary human engagement. Relatability is the missing ingredient.

[26:36] Jeremy is working on a new product, and he shares his progress in stories via email with his prospects. He is getting great responses from people looking forward to this product.

[27:35] A story transitions to a lesson, adding value, that transitions to the product. Jeremy gives an impromptu example. Stories work well, for face-to-face, or by email.

[33:08] Showing vulnerability through personal stories helps people relate to you, better than to the ‘robot’ that just visited with a script that didn’t speak to them personally. No one wants to talk to a salesperson, but they’ll talk to a friend.

[36:48] We all have stories. Look for them. A made-up story is inauthentic, so talk about real events, and memories, and real emotions, that lead to real lessons, to sell your real product.

February 1, 2017

How to Make Your Own Game in Sales. And Win. With Chris Brogan. #370

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest Chris Brogan, CEO of Owner Media Group (which provides skills for the modern entrepreneur), a highly sought-after professional speaker, and the New York Times bestselling author of nine books and counting, his latest being, Find Your Writing Voice.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[1:54] Chris introduces his book coming out, called Make Your Own Game. The book has two sections. First is The Fast Book, for people who believe they are too busy to read. Second is The Real Book, for those who want it all.

[2:51] Make Your Own Game first teaches how to win a game, seeing it as story (who, what, and why you are playing), rules (how to play), and strategy (how to win). Second, it teaches how to create your own story, rules, and strategy.

[3:30] Some companies may say innovation is important, but then they retreat to, “That’s not the way we do it.” Innovation assumes risk, but proposes reward, and includes breaking out of the blue binder on the shelf.

[5:44] Chris tells how doing something extra on Facebook to connect, led to a third party’s offering him a business deal.

[6:33] There is a conflict in sales organizations between optimization of process and reporting through Big Data tools, and creating and nurturing human connections. Dashboards help, but people buy from people they know, like, and trust.

[10:31] It’s easy to see on social media what people’s interests are. Google your contact before your sales meeting. Find out what will help understand them better, and bond together.

[13:03] Your buyers are all involved in things outside the sale. There is great value in small talk. Chris would like to see it codified into systems. He admits to personally getting too familiar, too quickly, though.

[15:20] Teaching authenticity is like scripting improv.

[17:16] Andy suggests doing what you need, to be one percent better than the next guy. As the sales professional, you — not the price — are the first differentiation. Be your best you.

[18:44] Sales professionals need to spend more time learning about their clients and connecting to them. Uniquely human skills make the sale. Don’t show you are busy, show you are responsive to them.

[25:18] Sales is not about metric-driven methodologies. It’s about people. The biggest challenge in any sales organization is engaging with the prospect. It’s hard to put metrics on a sales rep’s ability to get others to ‘know, like, and trust’ them.

[29:47] Sales professionals, like most people, want to have a system. The sales challenge is to learn a really simple system to win the sale. Chris wants his book to help people with this, using self-permission.

January 26, 2017

How to Shorten Time to Revenue with Account-Based Everything. With Jon Miller. #365

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest Jon Miller, Founder and CEO of Engagio. Among the many topics that John and I discuss, are how Account-Based Everything (ABE) is not marketing automation but human engagement, methodically orchestrated, assisted by data; how ABE breaks down silos and aligns marketing and sales; and, how ABE shortens the time to revenue for the large, complex sale.  

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[:46] Jon’s BS is in physics, studying fusion. He was accepted by MIT into a Ph.D. program, but, instead, followed his friends into management. Engagio is Jon’s second startup. He cofounded Marketo — recently bought by Visa Equity.

[3:28] With Marketo, Jon fished with a net for whatever they picked up. They tried reaching out to spear big fish with outbound marketing tactics, but Marketo was not a fit for that. Engagio was built as a platform for account based marketing.

[5:48] Until recently, marketing has been a lead-centric business, not an account-centric platform, as sales has been. When marketing and sales work together on the same accounts, they are more relevant, focused, and personalized.

[8:56] TOPO says marketing alone will only get about 15% penetration into the target accounts. What does penetrate better is the account based sales development function.

[10:16] Account based sales development, working independently from account based marketing, builds silos. Engagio works to build all functions together under the same tent: Account Based Everything, a phrase borrowed from TOPO.

[11:06] ABE is a strategy for aligning and orchestrating marketing, sales, sales development, and customer success, into personalized interactions across the account — both for new business and existing customers.

[13:03] How does the ABE approach gives a shorter time to revenue than marketing alone?

[15:34] Account based outbound lets you target big fish, reaching high into those accounts, using the challenger model to create the opportunity, which puts you in a strategic place.

[16:24] The traditional sales model for large account has many hand-offs. The ABE model involves everybody in an orchestrated process. There are no marketing deals or sales deals, but team deals.

[20:36] Jon uses two analogies for Engagio: the orchestra conductor, making sure the right people come in and out at the right time; and the football play mapped out in a diagram, emphasising the elements of the team.

[23:16] This is not marketing automation, but human engagement, methodically orchestrated, assisted by data. Jon explains how it is the opposite of sales spam.

 

January 16, 2017

How to Accelerate Relationship-building. With Keith Dugdale. #356

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest Keith Dugdale, CEO of The Business of Trust, which is a sales consultancy based in Brisbane, Australia, and coauthor of the book, Smarter Selling: How to grow sales by building trusted relationships, by David Lambert and Keith Dugdale. Among the topics that Keith and I discuss are the activities and mindsets that work best for relationship-building, when sales training is premature, and how trust means ceding control to the customer.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[2:55] Focus on helping a client succeed, and building a relationship of trust, and that will create an environment where they want to buy from you.

[3:32] The ‘I owe you’ approach is that the salesperson owes  the customer everything, for their present commitment of time, and potential future commitment of money.

[6:46] Top executives place a higher premium on their time than on money. They will give time to the person who gives the most return for it. This requires deep advance research.

[8:44] Look at the drivers of the person you are speaking to, the person’s business role, their organization, and most importantly, global and local issues within their industry.

[14:37] The standard sales development process many companies use that focuses on setting up meetings is not about relationships. Behavioral change is needed. Don’t invest in training until other key pieces are set up.

[15:36] Have a business strategy, a key account strategy that everyone believes, and long-term market share and revenue goals. Identify the key players, and who in your organization will build the relationships. Then align your infrastructure.

[18:49] Use questions that aspirational CEOs want to hear. Don’t ask what is their biggest challenge. Ask what is going really well, and, is there anything that could go better?

[23:35] We are losing our curiosity. What are the traits a salesperson needs, to ask the questions that build relationships.

[27:08] Trust, for the salesperson, is ceding control.

[29:50] No one likes to be sold to, but everyone likes to buy.

January 6, 2017

How to Get Motivated for 2017 (and beyond.) With Bridget Gleason. #348

Welcome to the year’s first episode of Front Line Friday with my remarkable guest, Bridget Gleason. On this week’s episode, Bridget and I discuss, among other topics, looking forward to the new challenges of the new year, how motivation — the why — underlies all action, great principles we’ve picked up from books we’ve read, and  what managers need to know about their team members to help them succeed in 2017.

January 3, 2017

What Salespeople are Doing Wrong on LinkedIn and how to Fix it. With Chris Hamilton. #345

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest Chris Hamilton, Founder of   SalesTipADay.com. Among the many topics that Chris and I discuss are Chris’s lifelong love of sales and marketing, how he decided to use LinkedIn as his sales platform, his upcoming book filled with LinkedIn advice for sales professionals, and tips to improve your sales results using LinkedIn.

December 31, 2016

Replay: How to Build a Predictable Pipeline. With Marylou Tyler. #330

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest Marylou Tyler. Marylou is the Founder and CEO of Strategic Pipeline, and coauthor of the classic sales book, Predictable Revenue, which she co-wrote with Aaron Ross. She is also the co-author of a brand new book, Predictable Prospecting: How to Radically Increase Your B2B Pipeline. Among the many topics that Marylou and I discuss are Marylou’s journey from engineer to revenue expert, developing your Ideal Prospect Persona, the Disqualification Engine, and her new methodology you can use to predictably reach new prospects.