April 24, 2017
Topics: Podcast

#440. Personal Branding that Moves Buyers. With Libby Gill.

Libby Gill, an executive coach, author, speaker, and CEO of Libby Gill & Company, joins me on this episode of #Accelerate!

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[:40] Libby started in PR for a small company, and through acquisitions, and “raising her hand,” became a VP for Sony Television. She moved to Universal, and then to Turner. She then decided to start coaching, to help people succeed.

[2:57] Social media has granted easy access to all voices. Professionals really have to stand out to be heard. All your platform exposures need to come from one authentic core. Libby explains the importance of your brand.

[4:41] Technology has facilitated the “instant expert,” who competes with your audience for attention. Learning how to create your strong, consistent brand becomes a real challenge.

[5:50] Having too many options available to the buyer creates confusion. Confusion is the end of the selling cycle. You need to create clarity for the buyer.

[7:39] Libby says any store has dozens of choices for blue jeans, and she would prefer to leave, than to deal with them.

[8:26] Libby asks clients first about skills, strengths, passions, and what their market wants. With that foundation, they build values and content for a forward-looking brand that tells their story in a few seconds. Don’t let others set your brand for you.

[14:47] A brand can involve a slogan, a logo, and your backstory. What you do for other people is your business story. When those are married authentically, then it makes emotional sense to people, and it captures mindshare.

[17:53] Libby cites Starbucks as a multi-sensory 360-degree brand, that surrounds a customer before they even consider their coffee choice. See that your brand hits on multiple levels.

[20:33] Think about your endgame from the start. Know the buyer you want to attract. Chart your steps, customer touch points, and the messages you send, and how you will send them. When should you provide value to the buyer?

[22:43] Libby discusses demographics. The “Moms” and Millennials want to know your advocacy, and they will choose a company making a deep contribution. But don’t paint them all with the same brush.

[28:56] Having a social advocacy resonates with many customers. Gifts can be made as donations in the name of the customer, rather than chocolates or food gifts.